The Rain drop that Became a Tidal Wave

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This has been one of the most phenomenal weeks of my life.

I live by working for the best; planning for the worst; and expecting nothing – swapping expectation for appreciation.

As my project completes week two, these three states seem to cascade over me with regular occurrence. I’m doing my best to stay focused on what I need to do and be patient, have trust that it will work out the way it’s supposed to. And believe.

On the physical aspect, so far my body, specifically my legs, are holding up really well. I’m now seven days into uncharted territory, as the most training hikes in a row I did was nine. Every day I remain rooted in how my body is feeling and climb Table Mountain accordingly.

It’s amazing how quickly our minds can race away with ideas – on the first half of the climb while my legs still feel fresh, I can get excited that perhaps my physical challenge is not going to be that difficult? And then I’m brought swiftly back down to earth on the second half of the climb when my calves, hamstrings and knees start to feel drained of energy as the gap between steps seems to grow each time I climb.

Incredibly, the place I’ve decided to place a rock to represent each day this year, is the perfect place to break this top half up. Not too high that its basically at the top and not too low that the rest of the hike would make me feel despondent. Below is my rock and the corresponding view it has (on clear days!)

Having these little landmarks to celebrate arriving at (others being the contour path and half way rock) make such a difference in ensuring my mental state is always positive about climbing the 730m vertical rise. It’s been a great lesson in how to tackle other life or business goals.

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First Signpost – contour path

 

 

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Halfway Rock
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View from halfway rock

INSIGHT: Create short term achievable goals that help you get to your overall objective.

I’m being taught to ingrain the principles of taking life one day at a time, one step at a time. Be prepared and know what you need to do to such a degree that every time you wake up, you know exactly what needs to be done to accomplish your major goal and larger than that: your vision.

I really do believe that we are better together and it’s when our heart is at the core of what we do; that we bring others along on a combined journey. A journey that has far more power than an individual can accomplish on its own.

The story of the Rain drop

There is a story of a raindrop that from the clouds up above, saw a town suffering with a lack of water. A natural dam had formed upstream, blocking the flow of water to the town.

He tried his damnedest to fall down to earth, reach the river, and break the dam down. Alas, each time he tried he failed. His heart sank as for the umpteenth time he returned to the sky unsuccessful. His best friend saw him despondent and asked him what was wrong.

Sharing his story, the friend listened keenly and just before the end of the story, another rain drop overheard him and asked him to repeat it. Determined, the three friends tried together to fall to earth, make it to the river and try smash through the dam.

Now it was three raindrops returning back to the sky with sad faces.

More people noticed the three droopy mouths and soon a large crowd formed around the three as they shared their attempt to break the wall down. The crowd started to chatter among themselves when the booming voice of a thunder cloud suggested each rain drop in the crowd gather as many of their friends and family, and get them to bring their friends and their families.

Millions upon millions of rain drops came having heard the story. The thunder cloud transported them upstream and told everybody to fall together and try land in the same spot. They listened and once they hit the land they quickly gathered in the water creating a flash flood.

In a short space of time – they broke through the natural dam, rescuing the town from the drought.

While the one rain drop wasn’t able to save the town on his own tried time and time again – it was he that sparked the others to join and with their sheer numbers and force – together saved the town.

We are better together.

Many of us discount our ideas or doubt that we can have an impact. I’m here to tell you to banish that thought from your mind. For good.

There will always be negative nancies trying to block the water, but don’t let them pull you into their reality. Stay true in your positive one.

The world needs people like you.

If all those rain drops stayed in the clouds the town would have all but died out. One act collectively can transform lives.

I’m inviting you to be part of 365 Ubuntu Climbs. I want you to close your eyes and imagine living in a shack; having children that can’t read yet and you barely earn enough to feed the family let alone send the to a better school. How would you feel hearing that you or a loved one had Leukaemia and you had a 1 in 100 000 chance of finding a match?!

Now I want you to picture:

  • Leaving your shack behind as you get the the key to your own house…
  • See the benefit of a new system that helps teachers educate children to read…
  • Matches patients with donors…

Imagine getting a second lease on life when it felt like all hope had gone.

See the ripple effect as people, down and out, start being given a helping hand.

Lets this year, put the ‘humanity’ into habitat for humanity; put the ‘heart’ into One Heart for kids… and be the ‘Sunflower’ (symbolizes longevity) in the Sunflower Fund.

Humanity, Heart, Longevity.

The very things we all deserve and can work towards.

Together.

For all.

You can donate and help me here:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

2018 – Start the Way You Want to Finish

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We’re already a week in to 2018 and boy has it kicked off in style.

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My very first step

The saying ‘the longest journey always begins with the first step’ has never been more appropriate for me than 04:33am on January 1st when I began my year long journey to make a positive impact for those born under more challenging circumstances than us.

What that saying never talks about though, is the support that others will give you on that journey. I had the absolute pleasure of being cheered on by my mom and Aunty San via my sports tracking app Endomondo as they were both awake in support and incredibly; met by this amazing human being at 04:15 before I started:

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What a legend – David Thompson (left)

To have somebody: Meet me. In the dark. On New Years day. At 4am in the morning.

Thats special.

It meant I started the journey of a million stairs with miscued high fives (it was dark okay!) massive hugs and sleepy smiles. In my book – I couldn’t have asked for a better start.

Why start so early? I hear you asking… well, I felt it was perfect way to begin 2018; watching sunrise at the top of the mountain. It would’ve been easy to go out partying sleep in and hike in the afternoon; but this is a year of focus and dedication and you should always start with your best foot forward.

I wasn’t even guarenteed with a view of sunrise as we were blessed with rain the previous day. As the light of dawn started to illumiate my path above, I saw Platteklip gorge, the route I’ll be taking every day for a year, blanketed in mist at the top. A mystical sight, but not boding well for a sunrise view.

I arrived up top to the mist having cleared – then reappearing below me – and the clouds above Table Mountain dancing in the wind. They parted for just enough time to allow me the opportunity as our first sunrise of 2018 appeared. All alone at the top, the same feeling I’d experienced the previous year in Iceland washed over me.

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We have the most incredible home

My first summit was complete. 1 down. 364 to go. (check out my blog here to read more about my 2018 challenge)

One week in and I already have donations coming in from around the world:

– ICELAND: I met Huni at JT Foxx’s Mega Success conference in November where he promised to support and has already followed through and I have no doubt will join me on some hikes later in the year too. He’s another amazing human being that I have no doubt will feature in more blog posts.

– NEW ZEALAND: Melanie Davey, whom I’ve never met, took the time to email me the most incredible letter of support and appreciation for my project. Words that reminded me how powerful they can be and that we need to be more mindful of what we say to others: and ourselves.

USA: Greg and Therese were hiking up on the Thursday with their daughter before the headed back to Denver a couple days later. They’d been chatting to my friend Achmat, a man who completed 131 Table Mountain climbs in 2017 and did 7 hikes in a row last week too. Walking up to them I was greeted with massive smiles and they wanted to know more about the purpose behind the 365 consecutive hikes. Upon hearing my desire to build homes; help teach children to read and increase the database for leukeamia they hunted me down on the net and found my blog to get in touch and pledge their support too.

If you haven’t guessed it yet the support has gone from a snowflake to a snowball the size of my hand getting bigger with every step I take.

6 January 2018

Enter my coach, Karel Vermeulen. We’ve only just joined forces but already his influence on my business ideas and suggestions for 365 UbuntuClimbs is being felt. All people who donate and/or help me increase the reach on social media to hit our audacious target are invited to climb up with me on one or more of the climbs; it’s a great way for people to be part of it more than just donating. They’ll forever be in history as they’re remembered in day X of 365.

Karel lets me know he’s planning on joining me and invites his friends to join on the morning of his birthday. Due to rain we move it forward to the Saturday morning instead. I’m doing videos up top every day and after we’d finished he suddenly requested Lezelle to do another one of us together.

My heart overflowed with his words and his additional pledge of R5000 over and above his donation of R1 per day; my minimum request for people to sponsor me as I undertake this grueling challenge.

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Karel (3rd from right) Lezelle (2nd from right)

Enter a chat with Lezelle post the video where she shares this experience and being part of 365 UbuntuCLimbs (her first time and the first group joining) is in her top three lifetime “awesome” experiences. She smiles as she states: “I am one of the million people you aiming to empower this year and I feel motivated for 2018”

Feeling absolutely pumped up from this, I head home where I had a catch up meeting with another new friend created through the JT Foxx organisation; Carolyne Opinde a.k.a the NGO Whisperer.

Hot tip: if you want to dramatically improve your network, head to one of the many JT Foxx events this year. There are a thousand plus motivated successful positive people attending for you to connect with.

My catch up with Carolyne leaves me feeling even more motivated and inspired with actions to complete this week. Embarking on an audacious project like this means I’ve inadvertently created a company (non-profit) which keeps me busy: learning, growing, implementing, taking action.

Interestingly I’ve created a full year working program with no days off; but importantly I get to spend two plus hours a day in nature. And truthfully, having the opportunity to execute this is far beyond what we define as work. I’m having a tremendous amount of fun!

Sometimes you might feel overawed by an idea you have or a task you need to complete. These can all be broken down into bite size chunks. 365 sounds a lot; focusing on the one I need to do today sounds much more manageable doesn’t it? Doing 3000 stairs in one go seems immense yes? Focusing on just the very next step means before you know it – you’ve completed a quarter of the climb; half the climb; the whole climb. Whatever you tackle in life:

It’s one step at a time.

To pledge your support please go to:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

every little bit helps – just ask the people who’s lives you’re helping change.

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2017 – A Year to Remember

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I write this as I wing my way back to Cape Town having spent a soul feeding week in the African bush with my family.

My dad reminds me today would’ve been gran’s 100th birthday. I don’t believe in coincidences. I’m about to embark on an ambitious year – and this is another heart warming moment of synchronicity to experience.

2017 has been one heck of a year.

I love the opportunity of hindsight to explore the events of the previous year. To “connect the dots” as Steve Jobs once said.

Here are the six most impactful events of my year and what each of them taught me.

1. Starting my year in Jokulsarlon, Iceland

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I chose to spend New Years in Iceland, in a tiny village called Vik. I shared the most incredible NY eve of my life with two other intrepid travellers from France. Never in our wildest dreams could we have predicted we’d see the northern lights dance above our eyes as Icelanders set off fireworks lighting the snow covered mountains up in red. Nature and man combined to create a show I will always remember.

They suggested I visit the area further east called Jokulsarlon, Glacier Bay.

A drive that belongs in the National Geographic Hall of fame awaited me and my prize: a receding glacier that’s created a deep bay filled with icebergs effortlessly floating. Ice that breaks off is ushered out to sea where the Atlantic uses its creativity to place blocks of ice across the black sandy beach as if it is it’s private art gallery.

Here – some 15 906 kilometers away from home as near to the edge of the world I’ve been – I feel for the very first time a tremendous love of my home. Our home. Earth. What a gift this planet is for us. My heart was expanded standing mesmerised by the beauty around me. Being so alone and yet incredibly connected all in an instant.

What changed in me: alone and in the harshest conditions I’ve ever experienced, I felt a realisation that we are never lost; just temporarily unsure. All it takes is asking for help and we can immediately be back on track. That sometimes its in being lost that we get to experience incredible surroundings with heightened senses that we’ll look back on with fondness and appreciation.

2. Having to find a new place to stay

This would be my seventh year in my flat and around February/March I had a thought “at some point I’m going to have to find another place to stay”.

I had no idea a few weeks later my owners would message me to say they needed to move back in and I needed to be out by end of May.

The rental market in Cape Town, and specifically the Atlantic Sea Board, has become a nightmare. Rental prices have sky rocketed and availability of units has all but dried up like our water due to people preferring AirBnB instead.

A dear friend suggested I write down absolutely every detail of what I wanted in my new flat. I was incredibly specific. After two months of searching with no success, it appeared I may have to take friends up on their offer to put my stuff in storage and stay in their spare room.

I looked at my list often and held steadfast in my belief I would find a place that met ALL the requirements. I had some wobbles where I thought “maybe I should just be happy with a few?”

Two weeks before I need to be out the managing agents of my current building send me a text “813 will be available beginning of June – do you want it?”

This came moments before I left for a weekend away. I was desperate to see it soonest and had to be happy with arranging a viewing Monday night. It was dark and with belongings all boxed up I didn’t quite fully grasp how perfect the flat was. I did get a good feeling about it and immediately messaged to say I’ll take it.

Only once they’d cleaned carpets and repainted and I moved in did I fully grasp how much of my list it satisfied – one of my favourites being able to lay in my bed and see Lions Head (those who live in Cape Town will understand what a rarity that is)

What changed in me: my absolute faith and belief. I was tested for sure; but being tested is how we gauge where we are in life. That I’d be in my same building, six stories up (literally moving up in the world) with my flat directly opposite the lift to move my furniture into is almost too good to be true and yet – here I am.

It’s been another massive stride for me to completely accept that whatever we want, we can get. Which is especially important for point number 4 coming up.

3. Going through a retrenchment

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I was emailed by a head hunter barely an hour before our department was going to hear what changes were being made. Before that point, based on the importance of my role, I confidently assumed I was going to be safe. That email triggered an immediate awareness that not only was my role in the firing line – but that this was the end of my time at Distell. My gut was speaking loud and clear.

My role had become a ‘promotion’ and even as others confidently suggested there was no one else qualified to do the job; I just knew it wasn’t going to happen.

I was right.

I was offered other roles but knew it would be disingenuous to myself and Distell to take them. I had lost faith in the company and didn’t feel any of the other roles suited my career progression. I’d just be taking it to have a job. I had a funny feeling something big was coming from this. I was terrified, especially at the fact that my future’s slate had been wiped clean.

I trusted it would be the best thing that ever happened to me – and I was right.

What changed in me: I started trusting to my gut and I also made a conscious move to start making decisions based out of love and not fear. Worrying about a pay-check and where money was going to come from was staying out of fear. I was done with that.

With uncertainty abounding I was a week from leaving when an idea dropped into my head that would (and subsequently already has) change my life.

4. Receiving the simplest idea

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Driving past Table Mountain the idea to hike up every day for a year was given to me and so 365 Ubuntu Climbs (Ubuntu is the spirit of humanity) was born.

Henry Ford said ‘whether you think you can or you can’t – you right’

I believe I am the luckiest traveller in the world, and that is why I saw the northern lights on New years eve. I have countless stories I can share about that. If you believe nothing good ever happens to you guess what…… nothing good ever will.

Taking the retrenchment with the faith and knowing that something amazing was going to come from it was rewarded a mere 8 days before my final day.

The idea set my soul on fire. Even when most people couldn’t grasp the enormity of what this meant, it didn’t waiver me from the endless possibilities it would create – both for me and others.

The idea was a simple one and using it as a platform to show people how easy it is to give by sponsoring me R1 a day would later develop into an audacious goal to use that money to positively empower 1 million people. Even as I sit here I can tell you that with each day that passes new ideas and exciting ways to achieve this goal flood my brain.

What changed in me: For the first time in my life, nothing but absolute self belief in achieving this feat existed in my psyche. This would be tested as the six month countdown began to such a degree that I almost allowed myself to get talked out of it from people who hardly know me. This taught me about how others can only see things from their perspective (which is based on their value system and experiences). They were looking at a piece of the puzzle telling me why that piece was a waste of time; while I was looking at the finished picture. It’s like arguing with a baker that egg, flour, milk, coco powder and villa essence mixed together will taste disgusting. Until they eat a slice of the cake created.

The greatest gift of all this year has been born from this idea. A deeper understanding of human behaviour, and not taking on others limited beliefs as my own. Just because you don’t believe you can do something doesn’t automatically mean that I can’t. In fact, I can see all the naysayers faces when everything I can see crystal clear in my mind comes into physical form.

It’s not about proving how right I am – it’s about following through on a simple idea that has the power to change a million peoples lives. Isn’t that something worth pursuing and being part of in 2018?

5. Speaking in front of 2000 people

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Once the 365 Ubuntu Climbs idea was given to me, I believed I could take this globally never mind to the rest of South Africa. I was introduced to a pioneer called JT Foxx, a man no stranger to naysayers and trolls, blazing trails across the world and giving people opportunities to elevate their success. A man who’s organisations credo is ‘powered by your success’.

He was hosting a Global event called ‘Money Wealth Business conference’ in Johannesburg on August 12th. People from as far as North America, Australia, Europe and Asia attended with the many local South Africans. It was the opportunity I’d asked for.

Not only had I spread my message to Johannesburg, but I now also had international supporters donating in support; even travelling from Switzerland to walk up with me.

What changed in me: I realised the power of following your heart and what you can accomplish when your soul’s been set on fire. What can feel like simple self development choices a year ago; like doing the “Courageous public speaking course” with Simon Ekin, could turn out to be instrumental later on. Like giving me the platform to speak in front of such a large audience. Passion speaks louder than being polished – and authenticity creates connection.

This has become the catalyst to show me how important to it is to have the courage to follow our hearts desire. That sometimes the worst thing we do to ourselves is over think things and the best gift we can give ourselves is to go for it. Take action. Move forward. That stumbling is better than standing still.

Nelson Mandela – who’s 100th birthday would’ve been in 2018 — said “it always seems impossible until its done”

My question is: Why couldn’t you be that person?

6. Traveling (again) to America over my birthday

JT Foxx hosted the Mega Success event at Disneyland in November and I’d have the opportunity for more coaching at his house afterwards. With no travel in 2018 I took the plunge and dipped into my bond to pay for the ticket. Something most people would frown upon as careless; but my gut said there was opportunities waiting for me I’d never otherwise get staying behind in Cape Town.

Ten months after arriving back to the day from my European vacation, I boarded a plane on my 38th Birthday bound for the US for the second time in my life.

Thanks to an amazing human being, Jessie Stuart, I was able to extend my trip by a week and stay with her in San Francisco. She’s an incredible human being that does fantastic work with Pencils of Promise, a non-profit dedicated to building schools in the poorest countries around the world. Her passion and enthusiasm for life, travel and focusing on what we can do instead of what’s wrong – is what we need more of in this world. Throw in the opportunity to travel with one of my best friends Lisa and without stepping foot off the plane, I already knew what a transformative three weeks these would be.

What Changed in me: my openness to listen to people with varying opinions to my own expanded. Life is about evaluating all the available information at our disposal and making our own informed decisions. Too often we follow one set of principles blindly or as gospel (religion, politicians, self help gurus, business giants, health experts) instead of understanding there is no one right way; but there is a right way for us – listening to our intuition and developing a deeper trust in our own decision making.

Success, much like happiness, is not a destination but rather a result of what we do and how we live our lives. Chase excellence, and success will follow. Chase fulfilment in everything that you do and happiness will abound.

We’ll never live in the absence of fear, of pain, of doubt, of difficulty.

But we can choose to push through bravely with love in our heart; with an understanding that pain can create drive to improve our lives; doubt is is just a made up ; difficulty is essential to develop appreciation and gratitude.

Stop hoping trying and wishing and start doing.

2018 will be a success because I will work and act in a way that I will create it. I won’t try I just will. Thoughts are nothing without actions. I am climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018 as living proof that powerful ideas while powerful – are meaningless without doing something with them.

If you had challenges in 2017 – be grateful for them.

My wish for you in 2018 is not just to feel inspired; but to feel inspired enough to act.

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Climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018

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I have a dream to help South Africa.

I have a dream to inspire people to discover what it feels like to live with passion.

I have a dream for love to fill people’s lives in spite of what life throws at them.

What is your greatest dream for your life?

 

Next year I’ve decided to climb Table mountain every day . That’s 365 ascents come rain, shine, heat, snow, hail or wind.

 

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The route I will take up each day – Platteklip Gorge

 

The idea was inspired by three main things:

1. Recently retrenched I, with no desire to head back into corporate, have no time restrictions any more.

2. I’ve been raising money and awareness for worthy causes actively for the past four years now and I want to do it every day.

3. I was introduced to a woman a month ago who’s climbing Table Mountain 67 days in a row for Nelson Mandela day.

On the 22nd June 2017 my idea was born as I drove past Table Mountain.

It’s a spectacular sight. It’s even more of a privilege to live in it’s protective shadow. What an honour it will be to face it daily and be tested.

I’m already learning lessons and I haven’t even taken my first step.

I’m raising money and awareness for three organisations that build homes; educate children and build on the existing database for Leukemia. Empowering people to take ownership of their lives.

I resonate with people that have taken tragedies and turned them into positives; improve peoples lives by not just giving handouts – but teaching them to become self sufficient. There are initiatives I’ve recently heard about in our townships I’m excited to learn more about and work with. I’ll keep you posted on who the twelve organisations will be.

Where do ideas come from?

I’ve been thinking a lot about this and how some people have amazing ideas that launch companies or products that change the world. Internet, flight, Virgin, medicine, take your pick there’s tons. These were all just thoughts in someone’s head that they then materialised.

I remember a colleague at The Pro Shop (a golfing sports store) constantly walking around proclaiming “all you need is ONE idea… ONE IDEA!!”

He’s right.

They don’t even have to be complex – like this one.

Just do one thing consistently for a full year.

I’m 37 now and I have no doubt that my life experiences (good and bad) and beliefs have shaped what, is for me, this perfect opportunity to do all the things I love.

This statement rings truer than ever now:

When the voice and the vision on the inside is more profound, and more clear than all the opinions on the outside, you’ve begun to master your life. ~Dr John Demartini

Powerful.

 

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The view from my 3 Peaks Challenge January 2016 (Lions head / Devils Peak / Table Mountain all in one day)

 

Self Belief

Last week I talked about ‘what defines your self worth’ and that plays a big part in this too. How many times have you had an idea, shared it, and been shot down by someone? Most likely you suddenly lost your shine and the idea started to fade. Ag it probably isn’t a good idea anyway We’ve all told ourselves that.

We allow others fears; their anxieties and their way of living to become our own – and it will cripple you if you keep allowing it. That’s why its important to surround yourself with people that continue to inspire you and share your passion and enthusiasm for life and support your dreams. Not their version of them – but your dreams; whatever they may be.

There’s no right or wrong way really; there’s just your way.

It’s like someone telling you who you should date based on what their own criteria is. You wouldn’t do that, would you?

The converse is just as important; it’s not just about how you are supported – but how you support others.

This idea opened a door to a new way of thinking. I stood on the balcony of my friends holiday home this past weekend enjoying the sunset. Surrounded by his best people for his 30th celebration, I took a moment to watch it alone. As if one of the mighty waves in front crashed over me; I realised all the work we put into ourselves – physically, emotionally, spiritually, intellectually – eventually pays off. It’s like making a cake, it only tastes great when it’s finished – not when you’ve mixed half the ingredients.

Impatience is our false shepherd. We want results now and the “success” of having our dream job or home. We lose sight of the fact that all our perceived failures and disappointments are helping shape who we are; that we’re learning from them.

I’m one of the lucky ones – I absolutely love my life and have pursued it with gusto and relentless passion. I’ve dreamt big; still dreaming big! I’ve learnt to forget about worrying ‘how’ something will happen and just keep moving forward and try new things and explore. Even through the difficult times. In fact it’s in these times I’ve come to realise how we don’t need much to be happy either. My measurement of success has been how much I’m fulfilled and the positive impact I can make in others lives. In fact, I prescribe to the new definition of a millionaire:

The number of lives you’ve positively impacted.

Let’s change the World.

Our actions always have consequences. Just look at some of the pain being experienced right now. People are dying of starvation and yet half the worlds food is thrown away? We’ve ignored the negative consequences and now profit is more important than people.

What is your dream at the moment?

Do you feel you’re doing whatever you can to achieve it? Even discover it?

Does your soul feel like it’s on fire when you think about your dreams?

What’s stopping you?

I think we believe we have to do massive things once to achieve our dreams; I, in fact, think the opposite is true.

We need to do little things consistently every day – and the cumulative actions generate massive success.

Start today

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Running (out of) Water

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I didn’t believe this would happen. Or perhaps, in all honesty, I didn’t want to believe it would happen. But the likelihood of the Western Cape running out of water is now a very real scenario.

Lack of appreciation

Theewaterskloof comparison

Rainfall has been steadily declining the past few years and dams like Theewaterskloof, the biggest supplier of water to the Cape, have dropped by 20% each year since 2014. 20% is not a small number, which ultimately begs the question why weren’t these conversations happening sooner? And if they were, why have we been so slow to react?

Nevertheless, I’m not here to harp on about that. Instead, I’d like to focus on three questions:

  1. What happens when we do in fact run out of water?
  2. What contributed to us ending up in this position?
  3. What changes in our collective attitude do we need to make?

1.Life without water

As always, the hardest hit would be the impoverished in the region who already have limited access to water. The majority of us take it for granted that we can just open a tap and, whammy, there it is.

Those of us in more privileged positions would at least be able to buy bottled water to drink. It’s the bathing and keeping clean which would no doubt affect people the most as well as sanitation.

Necessity is the mother of invention, maybe a good month or two will show us all how we can be more resourceful with our water and use it sparingly. Water is life and such a jolt to our systems to remind us might do the trick.

In my opinion this isn’t a ’recent’ problem though. I think this has been developing for quite some time.

2.Where it began

Before I go further, I’d like to mention the meat industry. They use a tremendous amount of water amongst other key problems they contribute to. You can read an informative article HERE for an in-depth look.

My focus is more on our lack of respect for the environment. It isn’t just South Africa – all around the world our cultures are ever more inwardly focused. Selfies, obsessions over more post likes, the boom in cosmetic surgery and dissociative behaviour towards any crisis not affecting people personally.

It’s no wonder our collective disregard for any water source has become normal.

Exhibit A: Just look at how few Americans (besides Native Americans) are fighting to protect the Missouri River from an oil pipeline.

Take for example any river in and around Cape Town – would you drink out of it? I definitely wouldn’t. Yet settlements all around the world that became large cities were all originally chosen for their proximity to water – Paris, London, Berlin, Baghdad, you name it. Communities need these types of water sources in order to survive.

Now think of the streams around Table Mountain that, as yet, are still so clean and tasty they put any bottled water to shame. Imagine Eerste Rivier and Black River were just as sanitary.

Everyone’s going to be affected; although I’m sure the exceptionally wealthy will come up with ways to ship in water for use. What a wonderful opportunity for us to work together on solutions going forward which will benefit everyone in our communities.  This brings me to my next point.

3.Collective changes needed

We really need to work on how we:

  1. Store more water
  2. Respect where we live and not pollute our existing water sources
  3. Maintain our reduction in water use post-drought and water restrictions
  4. Educate our children about water

As our population continues to grow and weather patterns become more and more erratic, thanks to global warming and climate change, we need to be thinking not just about this year. Or the next. Or even a decade into the future. This is a long term plan.  Thirty years down the line. Maybe even more.

What are we doing to protect our water for the next generations? Because if we know generations fifty years from now are sorted – that means we’re sitting pretty.

Global phenomenon

One down side to industrialisation is the fact our collective efforts have allowed us to become lazy. Unless you live in rural South Africa of course and are one of the c.74% who only have access to ground water (from wells, pumps etc.) But for most of us urbanites, we simply switch on a tap and voilà. If we had to walk, carry and then treat the water ourselves perhaps we’d be less inclined to litter and pollute our water sources. (It varies from country to country, but even in these cases we can see high levels of pollution). Just take a drive past Black River to get a sense of how bad we are.

WWF Journey of Water
Black River near Cape Town

Moving forward

Our biggest challenge is that this is a collective effort. It’s no good if some aren’t on board. This is where we as citizens must rise and step in when people so blatantly litter. For example, something as seemingly small as a smoker dropping their butt out of a car window. If I’m at a traffic light and I see this happen, I get out and hand it back: “Sorry – I think you dropped this”.

Obviously this is not a quick fix. We need to be realistic and understand that the majority of societies have zero regard for the environment.

At Afrikaburn, an event in the desert that has radical self-reliance as a core principle, there are 13 000 partakers and they need 4 000 volunteers. Their motto is “One burner, one shift” and it works.

Conceivably mandatory community service (whatever your social status is) will start changing attitudes? This isn’t a complete solution to the very grave issue we’re facing, but perhaps four hours a week picking up litter and trudging through our polluted rivers that smell to high heaven will start us down the right road? How long would it take to improve the environment around us?

We’ve lost touch with nature. We’ve been lost for more than a century, I think.

It’s time to start reconnecting; before it really is too late.

My favourite line in Bruce Almighty, is when Morgan Freeman (playing God) declares ‘No matter how filthy something gets, you can always clean it right up’

Our situation is no different.

Clearest Lake
The dream

South Africans, Time to Wake Up

reality-check

South Africa is on a precipice; and how we decide to move forward together is how history will remember us.

Where are we now?

I still see a country so divided on an issue that really we should all be standing together on; holding those in power accountable for stealing our resources.

So why aren’t we seeing that?

South Africa feels like a married couple – where either the husband or wife has been caught cheating but they are still living together. They’re staying together for the children; but because they haven’t dealt with the cheating, the fighting is incessant.

And now they’ve both lost their jobs.

It should stand that they do whatever they can to work together to survive the challenges ahead; but because the cheater is unable to fully understand the damage they did and wants to ‘simply move forward’ as though nothing happened, they seem to be a stuck record.

South Africa needs to listen right now to the few credible leaders we still have left, but there are two major issues we have:

  1. A credit downgrade tied to state capture and looting of our finances serves no one.
  2. We need to reconcile our past and forge a better way forward together.

Pravin Gordhan is not mincing his words anymore. Not only is he asking for an uprising, he’s doing so in a calm, collected and concentrated manner because he’s focused on what’s right for the country. For all 55 million people.

In light of his courage I think we can all follow his lead. It’s why I’m writing this. I think we should all (regardless of what party or race we belong to) ask ourselves an important question:

What type of country do we want for our children? ALL of our children.

The roots of such division

I can’t speak for the majority of this county but as a white male I can share thoughts as to why our country is still so divided from a white perspective. Why a crisis as big as a credit downgrade and our national treasury being looted doesn’t have everyone up in arms; why we aren’t all joining hands in unison to say “enough is enough”.

This next bit is specifically for whites in this country (and the migrators too actually) I hope this reaches the best part of your humanity and you go away thinking deeply about this. Our future depends on it.

If you’re wondering why we don’t understand why more black people aren’t standing up to Zuma; it’s because we don’t understand them.

And we’ve never really made an effort to either. I’m 37 and I’ve only started to try now.

So understand now that the deep seeded problems we have aren’t going away with a cabinet shuffle or new president for that matter.

We’ve all been on a sinking ship; it’s just that the previous cries of ‘we’re drowning’ below are being heard as the feet of the middle class start getting wet.

The purpose of this is to stimulate dialogue. Not to offend or make you feel guilty – if you do I think you need to look inside and ask why.

Let’s keep using the married couple analogy.

In this instance the major pillar of a relationship has been broken: trust.

Trust is not something you can easily get back. It takes time and commitment to build that back up. From both sides. It also takes an immense amount of communication to talk about everything from the honest truth of why you cheated, to how you felt being cheated on.

This takes adult conversation. It’s raw, hard, and will feel like pouring chili powder on an open gash.

Take the first step

The older I get the more I realise how many whites in South Africa (the cheaters) have never truly understood what pain and mental torture black people experienced during apartheid. Recognising my part in our society’s current ills, I’ve started speaking openly to friends and colleagues to ask what their personal experiences during apartheid were. I can’t change the past and that’s not why I’m doing this. I do feel, however, that understanding what they went through helps me understand actions and behaviours today.

That means I can be part of the solution and not a blockage in the system.

In every case, I could feel how those memories were still fresh in their minds. My skin went cold hearing what they experienced. Whether it was being scared of white people walking down the street; or simply playing outdoors and having to run inside because a cop car drove through the neighbourhood with policemen and their guns loaded firing shots.

There are many who spout forth how Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is terrible and that they didn’t ‘benefit’ from apartheid. Maybe even express that they were poor under the old regime and feel now they are being ‘doubly punished’. Let me first clear up this confusion between your personal circumstance and white privilege.

  • You may have been poor, but you could still choose what schools to attend and get fully educated (not a state forced bantu education); choose a hospital to be treated in; place to live.
  • You may have been poor, but you were still issued a birth certificate with easily traceable paths to your family and your identity intact.
  • I doubt you were kicked off your land/ out your home in the middle of the night and shipped off somewhere completely foreign to you; in the process potentially being separated from your family.
  • You were never told that you were ‘less than’ another race and emotionally tortured.

Using personal circumstance to argue that you didn’t benefit from apartheid is like saying you also can’t swim but you’re the one with a life jacket around your neck.

If you read any of those (and there are countless more I can cite) and felt yourself saying ‘yes but…..’ or ‘I’m sick of being made to feel guilty’ then you are not reading (this article or any other for that matter) to learn and understand; but rather to simply reply. Probably to put forth your point of view which you believe is right.

Listen to understand. Not just to respond.

This is another symptom of why I think we are where we are. People want to be right rather than what’s right for the situation. The WHOLE of South Africa.

What can we do now?

This is another great article posted around what whites need to do in this country (read the full article here) and it talks about four mind set changes whites need to make, which I have summarised here:

  1. Farewell to innocence. Focus on fully understanding our dark past and the impact it’s had even if you personally didn’t do anything ‘bad’ – you were still a positive recipient of the principles in place. Admit that.
  2. Farewell to ignorance. “Ignorance of the law is not an excuse” and so too with racism and past injustices. Begin to understand.
  3. Farewell to arrogance. Stop posting replies online and using “Yes but…” when discussing current issues. It’s all connected; our current state didn’t ‘just happen’.
  4. YES to Africa. But finally, brother and sisters, compatriots, we as white South Africans not only need to say farewell (or NO) to these racist assumptions and habits. We also need to say YES to a new way of life, YES to our fellow South Africans.

All these things will help open proper dialogue channels instead of trying to justify one’s own innocence. Zuma is actually doing one thing right.

He’s like Aldara – a cream that draws cancer deep within the skin to the surface, revealing all the ugliness that was sitting beneath the surface.

Any discussion around Zuma should ordinarily be about him, but because our race issues and past haven’t been openly healed any discussion around him quickly becomes a race war. I don’t condone it – but I can understand why some black people sit back and, knowing he’s breaking the country, want to do nothing.

It’s the same reason people voted for Trump; why UK voters opted out of Europe.

When you’re already living in a world of shit, and someone comes along to shake up ‘the way things are normally done’, wouldn’t you also want to give it a try? I mean – when you have nothing to lose, why not?

Think about where you are reading this. Safely in a home you live in by yourself with running water and electricity.

Should you feel guilty about those luxuries? Nope, but understanding other people’s frustrations means we fight for everyone’s rights, not just when ours have been bumped.

Start understanding that in a marathon race you had a head start. Yes, we live in a world where we all have to work for what we want. I don’t live in a mansion because I can’t afford it; but then again I never studied my entire school career under candle light sharing a room with my brothers and sisters.

Thought for the article

You can’t solve a problem with the same mind that created it. You can’t understand someone else’s circumstances if you’ve never lived them. How often do we hear white people explaining what black people should do and thereby tell them how they should feel? Too often.

If you’ve ever been through our poorest parts of our cities at midday where unemployment and crime are rife, then ask yourself one question:

How strong would YOU be to be able to overcome your surroundings and get out of there if the tables were turned?

I have. And I don’t know if I’d be where I am today had the roles been reversed.

I personally believe now, after some deep thought, that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission missed an important part for this country to heal. ALL whites needed to go through it. To understand on a personal level the conditions people were subjected to. How they felt.

Think about how Germany sends all its children to concentration camps (even to this day).

Maybe then we wouldn’t be making such sweeping statements from behind our positions of privilege. I often feel people’s responses are like that quoted in pre-revolution France after hearing the poor people were starving because they didn’t have bread;

“Then let them eat cake”.

Privilege creates barriers to reality.

One of my colleagues told me I was the first person in 26 years to ask him questions about his background. That’s almost 10 000 days. I get it. White people are scared to broach a subject that implicates us in current day suffering. It’s easier to ‘get on with it’ and say the current government should do better thereby absolving ourselves of past injustices. Again – I don’t condone the government’s mismanagement of funds and corruption – that’s a separate issue. Understand how we got here and our roles in it.

Maybe taking a scientific approach would help people have dialogues rather than mudslinging contests. There’s always plenty of mud to throw and no one’s innocent. Remember the phrase “Let he who is free of sin cast the first stone”? I dated a wise woman who also taught me: “Throw a piece of dirt; lose a piece of ground”. These are all things we need to develop and understand before we enter difficult discussions because emotions are always going to run high.

And rightly so.

We all love this country and that is what we should be building the foundations on.

Love.

But if your son had been murdered and the murderer got a light sentence you would also find it difficult to ‘carry on’ with life.

Instead of being so quick to point out others’ ‘faults’, question why they don’t agree with what you believe to be right. Perhaps take some time to listen to them to understand how deep-seated racism has affected their lives – and still does today.

Let’s stand up and take step #1 and be accountable for the fact that we have privilege.

Then (and only then) can we walk side by side and work together to stitch up this fractured country and stand beside Pravin Gordhan against those trying to divide us further while they slink away into the darkness with all of our resources.

Is it worth arguing you’re right only to sit on the rubble of what’s left with a smirk on your face? Why not concede to what’s right for the country while you and everyone smile?

I vote for everyone smiling.

We need a revolution in our thinking – not just our government.

We need a revolution in our own behaviours – not just BEE in companies.

Who’s with me?

 

How can Adversity lead to Opportunity?

Adversity

Adversity is opportunity dressed in disguise.

It sometimes feels like it follows us around though, doesn’t it?

People who overcome adversity, particularly in a larger sense, are often like inspirational or motivational speakers. Their stories are inspiring but we fail to connect with their accomplishments to incorporate into our daily lives.

I hope we can change that today.

This past Sunday I was due to ride my 8th Cape Town Cycle Tour (formally known as the Argus – I still call it that it’s so much easier) and my 4th year raising money and awareness for *The Sunflower Fund; an organisation formed out of tragedy that now helps so many.

Alas due to extreme wind the race was called off.

The previous day; however,  a fire had ripped through Hout Bay destroying countless homes leaving thousands of people with nothing but the clothes on their back. With the race being called off, food and water from the race’s unused hospitality section was donated to the victims; as was the prize money. That alone meant my heart was happier Monday morning than if I’d raced and gotten medal #8. Example number one.

The Sunflower Fund

Tina Botha lost her son, Chris Collett to Leukaemia at the age of 17 – a month shy of his 18th birthday. Read their story here

I personally can’t imagine too much worse than this. Death is never easy but to lose your child? How incredible then that she took their experience to generate this organisation to tirelessly work to increase the database of donors for people with Leukaemia.

This is one of the reasons I support them the way I do (and became a donor). The strength it took to overcome heartache has now generated something special that helps saves lives.

She wasn’t defined by what happened to her – she’s defined by how she reacted though.

But how does that help you with your daily adversity you face?

The Gray’s story

Brian took some time to chat to me about when their daughter was diagnosed with Leukaemia seven years ago – she was only three.

When they got a phone call like this they suddenly realised how limited their knowledge on the subject was; it just sounded like death.

Living in Pinelands turned out to be a blessing as treatment took place at the Red Cross hospital just five minutes away. The news meant both Brian and Sharon’s thoughts were running away with them. Thankfully the doctor and staff at hand were outstanding.

It was carefully explained that firstly, until the doc says panic there was no reason to. He meticulously went through the protocol of what would happen during the typical two and a half year process for girls this age; what each drug was and what it would do to her system (good and bad). They were also given great advice on how to keep her isolated when her immune system would be at its lowest.

Even in these darkest times they were blessed with being able to do everything in the best possible way to support her recovery.

“If you ask me a question, I will answer it honestly” he warned. “I won’t just tell you things you may not want to hear – like what is the survival rate”

They would still ask him that question.

Somehow just having a plan in place helped Brian in particular, and they had a purpose and short term goals to work towards. All welcome distractions from the worst outcome a parent can imagine.

It may have been over five years ago, but I could feel the emotion of what they went through. Hearing how Brian and Sharon fought through this time and the strain it put on each of them and in their lives, showed that even with a positive outlook it doesn’t change the fact that we are negatively affected by such experiences; physically and emotionally.

Adversity doesn’t keep time and they would sometimes have to rush their daughter to the hospital at 2am when her temperature soared; only to get home at 5am get changed and head to work.

Initially they thought that the staff were uncompromising – but soon realised they were committed to the kids first and foremost; not worrying about the parents feelings. As the treatment progressed they would see ‘new’ parents expressing the same frustrations and finally watch their penny drop that the ‘abruptness’ was because their job was to save these kids – not pander to what the parents were experiencing. The Gray’s would later be grateful for this.

Thankfully, little Ms Gray responded well to treatment and is now a happy ten year old with an added dimension to her very being. She’s a fighter who soldiered through her treatments; what at the time ended up being half of her life. I look forward to seeing how she uses that strength in the rest of her life.

Here’s the twist.

Having registered as potential donors for their daughter (they only start doing searches and comparisons if response to treatment doesn’t go well), Brian was contacted six months later to say he was a match.

Just try imagining this. You are watching your own daughter go through treatment – and you hear you can help someone who didn’t respond to it.

Adversity had inadvertently enabled him to save another human being.

He underwent two more tests to ensure he was a perfect match. Almost a year after his daughter had been diagnosed; he would become a lifeline.

For a week he got two injections a day to stimulate his body into making additional stem cells and pushing them into his blood stream. The day finally arrives and he sits quietly for seven hours as they draw his blood, and use a centrifuge machine to spin the blood and collect the stem cells.

There is no pain

Read that as everyone has no reason not to sign up to the registry and potentially save someone’s life.

In South Africa we have 73 500 people registered (about 0.14% of the population) versus a country like Germany, where being a donor is entrenched in their culture, has 9 million people registered (11% of the population)

To this day his recipient is doing well and now that the five year mandatory waiting period is up; Brian and his donor recipient can meet up. He hopes to meet the person and see them healthy and strong.

The family experienced tremendous hardships through this but learnt some valuable lessons.

  1. Time offers wonderful perspective. And these perspectives will always be revealed to you.
  2. Seek help. Brian openly expresses to me how he tried to be too strong for too long and eventually broke down. Speaking to a professional he was able to process this ordeal and now has a healthy respect for seeking help and often guides people today to seek the same. There is no stigma or shame in doing so.

Adversity means different things to different people.

It can change the course of our lives or just the course of our day. What stands out is no matter what it is – it’s the same mind-set we all need to push through to change it into an opportunity. Even if we don’t know what that opportunity could possibly be. We simply have to have faith that it’s there.

I believe part of getting through adversity is a belief that it’s more than just about us. Believing that we’re all here to help one another – in whatever way – cultivates a mind-set to push through darkness towards light. Look how the Grays overcame everything to help their daughter.

Once we overcome adversity we come out the other side a changed human being and that benefits everyone – not just ourselves. Case in point: Tina & all the Grays.

Some things to think about before adversity strikes:

  1. It takes time. Be kind to yourself and take the time you need to process what happens.
  2. Let go of attachment. Holding on to what we want versus what is reality will drive you mad.
  3. Only deal with what’s in front of you now. Your doctor may have found a lump but until you get the test results back it could just be benign.
  4. Don’t be a pawn, be a player. Decide whether you going to let it stop you, or you going to move forward the way you choose to. Players make the move.
  5. Feel your inner strength. We don’t give ourselves enough credit. Start feeling your inner strength and stop believing others ‘just happen to have it’ more than you do. Just ask Tina and Brian and never be afraid to ask for help. Asking for help is one of the true signs of strength.
  6. Learn from others. We are not meant to do everything alone. Ask for help, get advice, and surround yourself with people who contribute to a positive mind-set rather than constantly berate you.

These can take time to build up so I found a great table with a way to frame questions you’d usually ask yourself to be more positive:

AdversityTable

Courtesy www.rebootauthentic.com

I hope you can find a daily practice that allows you to take the shit you’ve been given and use it as fertilizer to grow something new; something beautiful.

Maybe even a sunflower.

 

*If you’d like to register as a donor visit them at www.sunflowerfund.org.za  and if you’d like to contribute to their cause and help people get type tested – a cost of R2000 per person; their details are as follows:

The Sunflower Fund

 ABSA

 Account No: 405 183 4719

 Branch Code: 632005

 Hope begins with you

Speaking for those who can’t speak for Themselves

pregnant

You never know when a profound moment is going to happen in your life.

This would be one of those days.

The unseasonably late snow meant there was a sharp bite in the air but provided a beautiful backdrop of lightly dusted mountains.

Worcester summoned six of us from Distell so we piled into the minivan for the ninety minute journey. Feeling honoured but not entirely sure why I’d been asked to join the others; I asked the question and they jokingly admitted it was to be the spokesperson. We all laughed – but they weren’t kidding. Thankfully this was the case because what an eye opening and educational experience this was.

We were on our way to meet with the CEO and founder of FASFacts, Francois Grobbelaar, to hand over money we’d raised earlier in the month at a golf day.

What an incredible man and what a company.

It’s why I’m compelled to share their story.

Who is FASFacts?

FASFacts (Foetal Alcohol Syndrome Facts) is a Non-Profit Organisation (NPO) committed to eradicating FAS by educating mothers not to drink while pregnant. They were born out of a growing epidemic in South Africa that started during apartheid with the ‘dop system’ – paying labourers on farms with wine. With little to no education many women would then drink while pregnant.

Don’t be fooled into thinking this is only a problem affecting disadvantaged areas – this is a problem across all races and sectors.

There are currently between 2-3 million people in SA with all the symptoms of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and another 5-6 million people with some of the symptoms. Sadly, this means there are 7-9 million people in SA are permanently brain damaged by prenatal alcohol exposure.

FASFacts vision is for all children to be born without FAS and they’re working to achieve this by implementing programmes and campaigns in affected communities to decrease the prevalence of FAS.

Francois shared his journey through life and how he came to know that this is what he needs to do. It’s amazing how much power is behind an organisation when you hear the personal story of why someone does what they do. When you look into their eyes and feel their passion. Sitting next to him I was humbled to be in the presence of such an incredible selfless person.

What impressed me about their organisation is the fact that their program is about empowering communities with education and ownership. It all starts by educating children in schools and getting them to pledge their commitment to making positive choices in their lives. Secondly, through their ‘Train the trainer’ program, mentors are educated on the devastating effects of alcohol on unborn children. Then, armed with knowledge and tools, these mentors go back into their communities and walk, door to door, talking to each and every woman who’s pregnant.

At times it must feel like a far more insurmountable climb than the mountains that surround Worcester, but each interaction is another step closer to zero babies being affected.

Just think for a moment from the perspective of the child whose life is spared from this dark path.

Is it worth chancing? In life we all have to go through the same challenges – why put your child on the back foot from day one?

The simple fact is there is no known ‘safe’ amount of alcohol you can consume during pregnancy. Fact

Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is 100% preventable. It’s also 100% incurable. Fact

Effects of alcohol on the unborn child

Permanent Brain damage. There’s no need to sugar coat here and this alone should be reason enough for no woman to drink.

fas-brain

Here are other problems associated with FAS:

  1. Poor growth. New-borns may have low birth weights and small head sizes. They may not grow or gain weight as well as other children and may be short as adults.
  2. Birth defects. Developing babies may have heart, bone, and kidney problems. Vision problems and hearing loss are common.
  3. Seizures and other neurologic problems, such as poor balance and coordination.
  4. Delayed development. Kids may not reach milestones at the expected time.
  5. Behavioural problems. Babies may be fussy or jittery, and have trouble sleeping. Poor concentration, stubbornness, impulsiveness and anxiety are also a potential problem.
  6. Older children and teens may have:

* A lack of coordination and poor fine motor skills

* Poor social skills (difficulty getting along with friends and relating to others, etc.)

* Learning difficulties, including poor memory, difficulty in school (especially math), and poor problem-solving skills

Source: www.kidshealth.org

What can we do?

Educate and support.

It starts with each individual. You’ve already started here and so share what you know with as many people as you can.

Supporting FASFacts will be greatly appreciated. It becomes difficult to truly quantify what the impact of FAS has on society as a whole because of all the physical, emotional and physiological disorders listed above existing sans drinking during pregnancy, but with Distell’s commitment to working closely with FASFacts, a study was conducted to see what impact these programs have had.

Behold South Africa Consultancy (Pty) Ltd were commissioned to conduct social impact analysis to determine the social value of FASFacts work. Here is the report:

  • Of the 120 women who were mentored through the program during the period of the review 76 (68%) reported to have stopped drinking during pregnancy all together and another 16% reduced their alcohol intake.
  • 21 of the women were teenagers. 11 of them (52.4%) also reported to discontinue their use of alcohol during pregnancy completely.
  • 13 of them (61.9%) were attending school and six of them went back to school
  • An additional spin-off is the fact it increased responsible parenting in the affected communities. There was an increase in women who felt empowered to take control of their lives and found employment after participating in the Pregnant Women Mentor Program (PWMP)
  • The lifestyles of the mentors who form part of the PWMP were positively affected too, as 55% of them reported to have stopped drinking themselves and felt uplifted by making a positive contribution to their communities.
  • Other effects of increased awareness around FASD included enhanced mental and physical health, an increase in positive behaviour and more stable families.
  • These reductions in drinking behaviour reflect in sharp increases in employment after PWMP (60%) as well as cost savings in the household and reduced future health related costs.

*Source: Distell Transformation Handbook – Behold South Africa Consultancy (Pty) Ltd social impact analysis

Proof is in the pudding and these are all outcomes worthy of our support.

Help a worthy cause

FASFacts goal is to have an office and staff in each province by 2020 (they are currently only working in the Western & Northern Cape). To achieve this they need all the help they can get.

No amount is too small so pledge your support and make a difference to the well-being of our society.

FASFacts

Bank: ABSA

Cheque Account #: 40-5648-4460

Branch: Worcester (632-005)

Visit them on www.fasfacts.org.za to see more of what amazing work they do and become a donor.

How much will it cost you to share this story? You might only be able to help one child in this world; but to that child?

You’ll become the world.

…Even if they never get to meet you.

fasfacts