Nelson Mandela’s 100th Birthday: How He Influenced Me

Neslon Mandela

Today would’ve been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, it coincides with my 199th hike up Table Mountain joined by Elliot (from Langa) and Raquel (Switzerland) – this makes it 100 days that I’ve been joined by people this year. My gran was Swiss and if she were alive – would’ve also been 100 today.

Life’s synchronicity is beautiful.

His first seed planted with me

I was thirteen years old when Nelson Mandela visited our school and spoke to us. The youngest boys always stood in front which that day, was our blessing.

Neslon Mandela at KES 1993 Renaissance Guy
1993 – the beginning of a sweeping change for South Africa

I was too young to fully take in the message he gave us, but thankfully able to go back into our school’s magazines archives the sentence ‘his message to the young boys was that the privilege they enjoy carries responsibility.’ Reminds me 25 years on.

Being a white male in South Africa means there’s a dark past attached to you. My journey to come to terms with that and what it means hasn’t been an easy one. As recently as five years ago, I thought ‘I didn’t personally benefit from Apartheid.’ And thought I was kind of ‘in the clear’ if you will.

This was an uneducated thought rooted in ignorance.

It took a woman by the name of Dr Jackie Naude (author of Finding the Rainbow) to come to Distell and provide a transformation workshop to begin to change this. She provided and open forum discussing a painful past from an objective point of view in a safe environment. The first time I had a detailed explanation of our past in this manner.

Understanding what the British did to the Boers (Afrikaners) by putting women and children in concentration camps (yes that’s right, the British invented this); The Afrikaners rule and desire to never be subjugated again, creating apartheid through to the release of Nelson Mandela and how he, somehow, managed to stave off a full blown civil war – a horror I can’t even begin to comprehend.

I wasn’t just understanding how we got to the present day, I started to understand how I benefitted from a system purely because of the colour of my skin.

I started to understand I was privileged.

My Journey with Privilege

I understood that one of the biggest problems with BEE (Black Economic Empowerment) was the communication around it and that it wasn’t a call to immediately thrust previously disadvantaged people in to high positions; but rather an opportunity for business to understand the previous injustices and to work together with government to rectify this over a period of time.

This is a contentious issue but effectively, business buried its head in the sand not truly understanding the requirements.

White privilege is a phrase that makes most people feel guilt or shame. I know I felt very uncomfortable so avoided public talks about it and if it came up, tried to defend myself that I personally hadn’t done anything wrong.

This is not something to defend.

It led to a profound understanding I live with today and where one of 365 Ubuntu Climbs pillars was born:

Just because I’m not personally responsible for someone else’s suffering; doesn’t mean I can’t be part of the solution to help them.

Mandela’s Deaths Impact

I was driving on the highway past the airport, a profound sadness came over me as I heard it on the news. A quick gaze right and my eyes were met with a sight I’d seen every day twice a day for two years: shacks.

We’re not doing enough…I thought.

I started thinking about the 5 000 staff at Distell and I imagined every staff member donating R10 a month – that’s R50 000… then I realised our Southern Africa offices pay R50 per person for parking; not exactly an amount that hurts your pocket. Using that amount it quickly rises to R225 000! In one year: that’s R2.7 million.

And we think we can’t do more to help others?

On the rest of my drive took questions like who builds homes? How do I find them? And who do I speak to? All rolled around in my head.

Simply sharing this idea with colleagues over coffee’s where I got my first break – ‘you should contact Habitat for Humanity’. And so, my relationship with them was born. Distell human resources department didn’t bite, but the Corporate Social Responsibility department, with whom I’d built up a relationship thanks to my work with the Sunflower Fund – did.

They got involved and built two houses which, both times, I was away on business unfortunately.

Opportunities to Think Differently

The Jacob Zuma protests in 2016 made me question how the protests were being conducted, because I saw them creating more of a divide in our country. I asked (didn’t assume) why weren’t black people joining in? A quick response around a tragedy here called Marikana, a mine where 14 miners were shot (unarmed and running away) in the back, again opened my thinking.

There were no protests organised then.

It hit home the hypocrisy around what marches were organised and that the marches against JZ were only because whites were affected by his actions.

I was seeing how its not always what we say, but sometimes what we don’t say that can be as damaging. This made me realise another painful truth on my part.

I’d never spoken to any black person (friends or colleagues) about what life was like under apartheid.

To understand today you must understand your past. “YOUR” as in country not personal. That means talking to people with alternate views and experiences to your own.

Those were some of the most heart breaking and difficult conversations I’ve ever had in my life. I appreciated all of them taking the time to go back and open wounds to share the madness and atrocities they experienced. Its why I wrote ‘South Africans – It’s time to Wake Up’

It wasn’t about trying to make things better for them; it was about opening my eyes to understand why certain protests happen now.

You might not condone an action like burning tyres on highways, but you can understand where its coming from. Instead of replying in ignorance, I now have a conversation with compassion.

None of us are in control of the privileges we are born into.

Was everything easy for my parents? Definitely not. But this is where my false sense of entitlement came from – I compared struggles without fully understanding the varying degrees of struggle.

Struggles of life are vastly different to the struggle against oppression.

Privileges come in many forms and I’ll never forget driving with my mom as a youngster and a man was in a wheelchair working tirelessly up a long hill. He was grimacing, and my mother pointed out how grateful we should be. That, as well as his determination, have stuck with me to this day.

It’s another form of privilege I have and why before every walk I take a moment to be grateful for what I have – my legs that work and are strong enough to hike Table Mountain every day.

Privilege is a word that makes people feel uncomfortable. It’s a word that today implies guilt and shame.

I used to say: ‘can’t we all just stop living in the past and move forwards together’ and now I try put myself in the shoes of those that have been oppressed. How would I feel 24 years on and nothing changed?

Its easy to want to ‘just move on’ when you’re on the right side of privilege.

Instead of feeling guilty or uncomfortable that I have privilege – I now think about how I can use it to empower others.

I can’t change the past; but I can change how I think today to make a better future for all.

It’s not about taking responsibility for Apartheid. Its about taking responsibility for the privileges it afforded me.

It’s amazing what can happen when you decide to stop carrying around negative baggage and decide to recycle it into something useful instead.

His Legacy’s gift to Us All

Together with all the freedom fighters, they gave us a South Africa to be proud of. We almost had a civil war – and came through peacefully. That should be celebrated every day.

We have the most amazing constitution in the world. Be proud of that.

The people of this country have endured some of the biggest atrocities in the world – and their spirit was never broken and are some of the friendliest people I’ve ever met on three continents. Just look at how we blew the world away in 2010. The smiles in this country are unparalleled.

You don’t believe we can make a difference? Go to www.365climbs.com and make a R50 donation and challenge everyone you know to do the same – and I promise – I will show you how wrong you are. Your contribution is invaluable.

If this project changes 8 000 peoples lives and each of those go forward and changes another 10 people, and then those people another 10 and another 10 then in 5 generations we have the power to empower 800 million people. That’s fourteen times our current population. You think you can’t impact 10 lives? Join us and be a part of that.

I want a phenomenal country for all that live here. Not just a few.

Imagine if you were living in poverty and got a helping hand out of it.

Final Thought

Asking questions is one of the most powerful forces for long lasting change. I speak from experience.

Instead of making social commentary about what happens in this country – I invite you to ask better questions and then: seek out those who can answer from their experience and not from their opinion.

I hope to see you on the mountain soon.

Nelson Mandela Renaissance Guy Passion

Hiking and Life’s Connection

Highs and Lows of Life and hiking
Even reaching the top of a hike doesn’t guarantee a view

Week 25 – The parallels of life and hiking

First up – special thanks to Wings Herbal Synergy for sponsoring me with supplements to keep my legs and body in the best health possible. Amazing because they didn’t want a big announcement about it, they are doing it simply because they believe in what I’m doing and want to help. Huge respect to them for that.

Whether hiking or living; you’ll experience highs and lows. The only difference between the two: hiking generally starts at the bottom for you to climb up.

Some days though, you can start extremely high. Recently though, my day started as close to the bottom as you can get with the news of my dear friend Joshua’s death.

Week begins with high and low

Monday the 18th is my grans 94th birthday and Joshua’s funeral in Melbourne. It’s one of those crazy days where you feel two opposite emotions simultaneously.

My gran and family still live in Johannesburg and this is now the longest I’ve gone without seeing her. She’s unable to travel so I’ll only see her again when I’m finished with climbing Table Mountain 365 times this year. I miss her.

Speaking to her before my hike, I can hear the sparkle in her voice as she sat comfortably in her new chair that had arrived earlier. A comfy lazy boy with massage function. Its great to hear her voice and it always leaves me incredibly grateful that at age 38, I have the privilege to speak to her still. Especially on a hard day like this.

Memorial hike

I promised Joshua’s mom and brother I’d hike at the same time his funeral and wake took place so in some small way, I could be ‘present’ from across the oceans. Fittingly, the weather is glum and overcast, almost as if the weather was mourning with us. I took a candle with me to light and sit with his rock. I picked up one on the day of his death to honour him. High winds meant the cable car wasn’t working and I hiked back down.

I chose to sit quietly on Ubuntu rock with the candle fluttering next to ‘Josh’. Amazingly – Ubuntu rock had not a breath of wind for the candle to burn uninterrupted. There we sat. As if inside a cloud, on one of the most recognised mountains in the world. Honouring a beautiful soul that now lives inside all of us that knew him.

He had endured such tragedy this year and I will forever be grateful for his incredible support for my project. I take solace knowing that he found some peace.

With the last quarter of the hike left, the biggest rain drops I can remember since running around in our garden as a child, descended on me. I tried to capture it in a photo to no avail. Felt like the last perfect send off to Josh. Lifting my face up, I felt rain against my face for the first time. Usually the peak of my cap and hood of my jacket serve to shield my face. It was the type of experience I would have jumped on to Whatsapp to tell him about because I knew he’d appreciate that.

Fittingly, the 365 Ubuntu Climbs shirt he wore with such pride went with him.

We all miss you my friend.

My friend Joshua crook supporting 365 Ubuntu Climbs

A break in the weather

In 34 days I’ve only had a view from the top 13 times. In the past 11 days, once. One of the greatest lessons to date is understanding that there’s no bad weather; just bad preparation. Thanks to Cape Union Mart and their brand K-Way – I’m prepared, and I’m kept warm and dry which translates into safe.

The rain pants in particular, are amazing. The day Josh passed I made the mistake of not wearing them and a serious downpour happened in the first twenty minutes. Now they’re on even  if there’s a remote chance of rain.

Rain is glorious news and I get excited every time for it. We’re in the grips of one of the worst droughts Cape Towns had in a century. Our dams collectively, have just squeaked past the 40% full mark. This is why I said at the beginning of the year I hope to hike in rain for 200 days.

You’re probably thinking “Whaaaaaaaaat?!?! Hiking in the rain is dangerous surely??” I think the mountain is more dangerous on clear warm days than on windy rainy days; because people think it’s a playground and don’t pay enough attention and respect to the mountain. Many rocks are slippery even without being rained on. Being in nature requires presence, in every moment and step. I believe injuries come from two things: fatigue and lack of respect.

Even today as I start my 176th hike this year, I pretend it’s my very first one. Every step is closely monitored, and I even check to see what rocks have changed position, look loose and are cracking open/off.

It’s a gift being on the mountain around the time of these storms passing through. To see the mountainside alive and water flowing in the most unexpected places is phenomenal. Summer hikers would walk past without ever thinking twice about a waterfall. What a privilege to get to experience it in every way.

My latest understanding

I was given an opportunity to speak to the South African Property Investors Network (SAPIN) again on day 171 having spoke on day 73. This gave me a unique opportunity to gauge who’d heard me speak then and whether they thought I’d be back having not missed a day on my quest to complete 365.

I admire their honesty, pretty much all of them said no.

I always knew most people would think that way and the only way to build trust is to keep doing what I’m doing. People watch your actions more closely than your words – and rightly so.

I’ve come across many talkers proclaiming to support, and they disappear into the distance like a tumbleweed blown across the desert floor.

These talks give me a great opportunity to share the purpose of climbing a mountain daily: to show the power we have as individuals and collectively when we stand together.

Why donate money at all? Well – having been involved in various projects since my high school days with King Edwards and their KESFAM drives, I can tell you there’s nothing like seeing the gratitude in the eyes of those you empower.

Just because we’re not responsible for others suffering, doesn’t mean we can’t be part of the solution to help them.

I don’t believe in charity – that involves keeping people out of their own power. Working with Habitat for Humanity; One Heart and The Sunflower Fund means we collectively empower those we help to take ownership of their lives.

Empowering those without the means to empower themselves now.

Speaking on Wednesday I realised that most people look at themselves as a Mt Everest of donating. In other words, it must be large sums of money to be meaningful. What they don’t realise is that even Mt Everest isn’t just one mountain: its made up of thousands of individual stairs from base to summit; each stair as important as the next.

Think of yourself as a stair to someone else’s Everest.

If every South African gave me R1 – we’d raise R56 million.

If 50 000 Capetonians donated R30 a month (not even 2 coffees) we’d raise R1.5 million a month

Ask the 2.5 million people in the UK that didn’t bother voting on the Brexit issue if they still feel their vote wasn’t important.

Our power lies in our collective efforts. Don’t ever say “I can only give….” Because your act of giving has the potential to change another human beings’ life.

Just ask each of 365 Ubuntu Climbs donors whether they thought they’d:

  • Add 20 people to the donor registry and potentially save 20 fathers, 20 mothers, 20 friends lives impacting all their families, friends and colleagues;
  • Help two of the largest primary schools in the country teach thousands of children to read and track the children’s progress
  • Help 10 families improve their living conditions to feel safer, warmer and drier.

And we not even half way yet.

Final thought for the week

My 300th climber to join me was Iona this past Saturday and her takeaway was Ubuntu rock and the accumulation of love that makes the walk into a prayer of love, hope and connection.

It was the first time I’ve asked for feedback like that and what an incredible answer to get first up.

Why? Because its what this is all about summed up perfectly. Life’s shorter than you imagine, don’t waste it living in fear. I promise you – I’ve never been more inspired by how much good there is in this world with all the people I’ve met thus far and through all the donations received.

I’m grateful to each and every one of you. Creating a better world requires active citizenry. As Gandi said – be the change you wish to see in the world.

Try it – I’ve never been more fulfilled in my life.

See you on the mountain

Andrew Patterson is hiking Table Mountain every day in 2018 (175/365 completed thus far) to build homes; teach children to read and build a database for Leukaemia. To become part of the Ubuntu Family (ubuntu is the spirit of humanity and compassion towards one another) head over to http://www.365climbs.com share your contribution.

It Comes in Three’s

 

table-mountain-hiking-trails-1511856660-1000X561
Devils Peak (left) Table Mountain (center) Lions Head (right)

Even the most Iconic mountain in the world is part of a trio.

The culmination of April see’s us complete a third of the year.

As I write this, I’ve completed 122 consecutive days hiking up Table Mountain. This gives me a unique opportunity to explore the 3’s that have followed me through the experience to date.

3 MONTHS WITH 3 FULL DAYS HIKING

When I was training last year, my thoughts wandered to “but what happens when people who join aren’t as fit and take an extra 1-2 hours longer?”

I’m almost ashamed to admit that I had plans to have cut off points and politely excuse myself as I continued without them.

Thankfully, sense prevailed.

I quickly realised on the mountain the value of the conversations and an old army saying (even though I never went) rang true: leave no one behind.

The important thing to realise here, is when I was on my own that’s exactly what it was about: me.

When 365 Ubuntu Climbs started, the focus was no longer on me; it was about the people we can empower. Building homes; building a database for Leukemia; building childrens minds by teaching them to read.

The irony is that even with the slower hikes, the longer months (January March and April) have still only yielded a full 3 days of hiking (and some change).

This means everyone who joins has invested in our idea with both time and money.

That deserves every ounce of respect. These are perfect examples.

Craig, having traveled with work almost two weeks away from home, was delayed for three hours on his flight back the night before our planned hike from Durban (2 hour flight): and still joined at 06:30 on a Sunday morning. No excuses.

Jessie, flew half way around the world from San Francisco to support me and hike up seven times in eight days; including the very next day after landing. No excuses.

Lisa, has hiked up with me 13 times; early mornings, cold, and on the second windiest day of the year to date. No excuses.

My sister Caroline, has adrenal fatigue and an under active thyroid. Truth be told, probably should never have climbed with me. Her commitment, willpower and sheer determination to support me pushed her up that mountain. She made it up on day 62. No excuses.

Each of my family members that hike up with me get to choose a rock to represent them. This I keep on Ubuntu rock (13% of the way left to go) and with about 50 stairs left till Ubuntu rock and utterly exhausted – she chose what is now lovingly referred to as ‘MF Rock’. Yup – that’s exactly what MF stands for.

It’s this type of commitment you can’t foresee when you have ideas and why it’s so important to follow your gut when an idea sits well. It’s why doing what you love can only bring you rewards you never dream of. Seeing others put themselves outside their own comfort levels in aid of others? Priceless.

3 TIMES WATCHING THE FULL MOON RISE ON TABLE MOUNTAIN

A blue moon is when we have two full moons in a calendar month.

I watched on the 31st January (second full moon in Jan and first Blue moon month of 2018); the 31st March (second blue moon month in one year – hasn’t happened since 1999 and won’t happen again until 2037) and on the last day of April: the end of my first third of hiking up Table Mountain 365 times (which is why this is even more appropriate)

I’ve wanted to watch the full moon rise at the top of Table Mountain since day one, but my first time relentless wind meant the cable car wasn’t working and I had to hike back down, so watched on my own half way down Platteklip Gorge to avoid hiking in the dark –  where I found my January rock.

       January’s second full moon     April Rock, March, February and January Rock               

March fell over Easter Weekend and I was joined by two special people, Jaclyn and Avril. What I love most about being accompanied up is the fascinating conversations shared about each others experiences in life.

Up top was insanely busy. Intent on not waiting in a mammoth queue, Jaclyn and I hiked back down to my previous spot where, in the ever increasing icy wind, we sat mesmerized by the full moon rising into the dark sky. Our journey to Winter responsible for the darker moon rise.

march-second-full-moon.jpg
The moon peaking its head behind the corner of Table Mountain as we sat huddled about 2/3 up

The 3rd one, Monday the 30th April, was finally at the top. With perfect weather conditions to catch the cable car down, Imogen and I (having lost 3 of our companions) settled up top to enjoy this natural wonder. With the sun setting even earlier, unaware people left around sunset (18:05) and missed the spectacle of seeing the beautiful full moon rising like the sun, while darkness shrouded us above the twinkling city.

April full moon
I truly wish you get to experience this in your lifetime

3 RAINY DAYS IN ONE WEEK

I always knew this was coming.

Like mid year exams looming in the distant future.

I’m exceptionally happy about the rain. We desperately need it – our dams are collectively sitting at 20% full. I’d be happy to hike in 200 days of rain – its all about mindset and dressing correctly plays a massive role in this.

I’ve been blessed to have Cape Union Mart (a South African outdoor, hiking, camping – gear and equipment store) come on board as a sponsor. This means they’ll help me stay dry, warm and safe. It was serendipitous that our meeting happened the day before I hiked up in complete mist (which is as good as being in fine rain) and the week before it rained three times.

The rain means the mountain transforms into a winter wonderland of sound and sight as waterfalls appear in places summer hikers would never conceive of. I consider it a great honour to bear witness to these changes that happen hourly as water collects higher up and rushes towards the ocean, as if in its own ‘rush hour traffic’.

This was highlighted on my second rainy day hike when, after a thunderstorm hit us between 3 and 5am, I expected a bigger rush of water at the start of the hike. Strong winds up top meant the cable car wasn’t operational and so I hiked back down; frozen hands dreaming about the gloves I’ll get from Cape Union Mart for just such future days.

wintery pic
Yep – the exit is down… down Platteklip Gorge!

Thankfully, my parents sponsored me a proper K-Way rain jacket last year already. When it started raining on the way down I was even more grateful. Well, I say rain, but I didn’t see any water falling to earth. It was more like precipitation seated in Airline Cloud traveling up Platteklip gorge. It was blowing directly into my face. Already warm from ascending 760 vertical meters and on my way back down I felt life flowing through me as life happened all around me.

Every step was as careful as though stepping onto thin cut glass. My Barefoot hikes perfect training for this as I become completely mindful in every step, and lost to anything else happening.

I’m alone on the mountain and I feel absolute peace. Bliss. Gratitude.

Some tourists have started hiking up (with appropriate gear, which is a first) and have just made it to half way as the rain and wind picks up. They turn back wisely, and I see them up top the mountain on day three – ironically also a misty and cold day with rain.

Day three the cable car, however, is working and cold soaked hikers fill the wifi lounge huddled around coffee cups.

Mervi, all the way from Holland with her husband, had heard about me through a friend and pushed on through the rainy bit to experience Table Mountain in a way most people avoid. Her smile at the end echoed her understanding of what she had just achieved.

Once again, the weather had been incorrectly ‘predicted’ and rain slammed into our faces  at the top. Having hiked back down the previous day my heart sat heavy at the prospect of the cable car being closed. This wasn’t in the script for Mervi’s hike up and, conscious of time, hoped it worked for them to do more exploring in Cape Town. Thankfully, that wasn’t a problem and we were able to enjoy a fantastic lunch at The Roundhouse where they spoiled me.

Here’s to the next 122 days

For the first time in my life, I’m creating my own adversity instead of waiting for it to happen to me. Reading this and my previous blogs this year gives you a snippet into the support I receive to make this possible.

I’m not doing this alone.

This happens because of my family, close friends, new friends and even strangers messages on social media’s support. Together we understand that this is about a greater purpose: empowering those without the means to empower themselves (yet)  – this is how I’ve climbed over 366 000 stairs.

Never underestimate the power your positive words of encouragement has on the recipient.

Ever.

This post is dedicated to all the people that have donated and the 215 people that have hiked up with me to date. Together we are making Madiba proud.

Inspiring-Nelson-Mandela-quotes-A-winner-is-a-dreamer-who-never-gives-up

Andrew Patterson has embarked on an ambitious project in 2018 to climb Table Mountain 365 times. This is all in aid of raising money and awareness for three organizations:
  • The Sunflower Fund – building a database for Leukemia
  • Habitat for Humanity – building homes for those living in poverty
  • One Heart – helping under resourced schools teach children to read.
To pledge your support and invest in this project visit: https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

 

 

Focus on the Journey

Journey

The journey of life has infinite experiences – and yet we tend to focus on a finite amount of them.

Destinations have somehow become the focus; and that’s as good as looking forward to death.

My path in the last eight months has given me great insights into what happens when you shift your focus to the journey and the path versus the end result or destination.

Climbing a mountain has a result of getting to the top and experiencing a phenomenal view; but that only happens when you climb the path to get there. The experience is in enjoying what the path has to offer. How different it is as you start compared to half way. Absorbing the changes in vegetation and elation.

There’s a difference between taking a 5-minute cable car to the top and seeing first-hand the layers that make up the mountain in a one hour hike.

Giving back

One of the aims of climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018 is to use it as a platform to raise money and awareness for those born into far more challenging circumstances than you and me. I’m working to empower one million peoples lives and that requires a lot of support and money to raise.

That brought many limiting self-beliefs to the forefront. One of which has been my hopes of always finding that ‘one big win’. Waiting for the lottery of life to land me my big break.

I had that exact hope for this challenge. I was introduced to a connected and wealthy philanthropic individual that I could see help me explode this across the world making it a huge success. Reflecting on my pinned hope showing no interest at all, means I now understand something very important. Had he jumped on board so early on: I wouldn’t have been learning what I am now about building this support network. I wouldn’t be focused on one avenue and be thinking about new ways to get the message out there. I’m not sure I’d be meeting the incredible people I am as well as being grounded in what a gift it is for them to come into my path.

Being taught to read instead of being read to.

The greater the lessons we learn the better equipped we are to empower others. My experiences are becoming far more valuable than my degree.

By not getting what we want – we get exactly what we need.

I certainly got what I needed by starting on zero instead of 90%.

They say you need to set goals so big that you can’t achieve it until you grow into the person who can. How true that is, and what they don’t mention is how much fun it is learning all the new skills and meeting all the new people to help you get there.

Things I may never have experienced if my ‘knight in shining armour’ had rode in on day one.

When things don’t work out exactly as you want stop worrying why, trust the process and smile knowing that all will be revealed at some point. You don’t need to see the oxygen in the air that’s helping you live – just be the lungs that breathe in the air never doubting its filled with oxygen.

Andrew Patterson is climbing Table Mountain (Cape Town) every day in 2018. His aim is to raise money and awareness to positively empower 1 million South Africans born into more challenging circumstances than ourselves. He’s doing this by channeling the money raised to

Habitat for humanity to build homes

– One heart for kids to help under resourced schools teach children to read

The Sunflower Fund to build a bigger database for Leukaemia

To be part of this movement DONATE HERE:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

do for others

Locked Out… Again.

locked-out

I was inadvertently locked out my flat yesterday with no shoes, no mobile phone, no wallet.

It happens so quickly I can’t believe I’m in this situation. Again.

In ten minutes my next meeting, a teleconference about my upcoming ebook, starts and I have no way to access it nor alert the other members about my situation.

I make a beeline to my friends apartment not a hundred meters away whom I gave a spare key for just such an emergency.

“YES! his car is here” my heart praises my head for such clever reactions to my previous predicament; but he’s not home. Out for one of his afternoon walks I surmise.

I immediately make peace with the fact I’m going to miss my teleconference and that feeling bad about not even being able to let them know what’s going on is a wasted emotion.

I quickly settle into my comfy state of nowhere man status.

And so I sit and wait. For 100 minutes I had a taste of being homeless. Suddenly my thoughts of food seem more intense; my feet felt more sensitive to the hot asphalt.

To curb my ‘boredom’ of seeing and watching the same scenery I walk up and down Clarens road from his house down to Beach Road.

I see two people I know, one of them stopping to chat for a while and catch up. Another  recognises me from my Facebook videos I post and introduces himself and his wife. Most people simply go about their late afternoon oblivious to my predicament. Just a stranger sitting on the pavement with no shoes smiling at all who pass.

My thoughts flicker between my climbs; my current appetite for learning to understand my intuition and aligning to my true purpose; food; and wondering how long I may end up being stranded.

People I need to get in touch with; work I need to do and this blog that still needs writing get interjected between all those thoughts.

It is as if I was in some kind of dreamland where I know I’ll wake up and everything is fine.

My thoughts turn once more, this time to my earlier chat with a numerology client about my current understanding that there’s no such thing as a ‘bad’ thing. Something that feels bad now could, in two months time, feel like the best thing ever.

Bad is just a matter of perspective and time.

With enough understanding that everything happens to us to promote growth; we become victors and stop being victims of life.

No more ‘oh poor me’ cries.

It’s a beautiful thing, given time to think – especially without interruptions.

I wish we’d all spend a bit more time doing it. Then maybe we’d realise what this world would be like if everyone took better care of themselves. Perhaps we’d realise how powerful our thoughts really are. Maybe even that we each have the power to create incredible magic in this world – if only we just believed in ourselves that much more – maybe even at all?

Being locked out doesn’t mean I have to search for an answer as to why. We tend to do that. Instead, just enjoy flowing down our river of life and chalk up certain experiences as ‘unknown good things’.

Who knows, maybe there’s a thought I created in that moment of stillness sitting on the steps on Beach Road that’s already started it’s journey to becoming something grand.

Only time will tell.

One things for certain –  Be kinder to yourself when these sorts of things happen and have a good laugh about it.

 

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The World Needs more Doers

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We live in a time when access to people all around the globe and information is as easy as opening an app on our phones. Thinking about nationalities is a dying breed – we’re all global citizens now.

While there’s a lot of negativity around the use of mobile phones and how society is being turned into ‘walking zombies’; I believe they’re still important.

It’s not the device that’s the problem; it’s how we decide to let it run our lives that is.

Anything in excess is bad; it’s why it’s vitally important for children to be educated about balance.

So should we adults not be educating ourselves about balance as well?

Times change so rapidly, most people prefer to ignore the change and pretend it’s not happening; but just as tax lawyers and accountants need to keep current with changes every year – so too do we need to keep up with changes in the modern world. In fact, we should be proactive about what the future holds.

Ignorance is not an excuse.

Every person on this planet is responsible for themselves: their happiness; their successes; their character. When we blame others for our circumstances we give away the one thing that’s our prized possession – our power.

Yes, people are born into more challenging circumstances than our own, granted, and that’s where the onus is on us born into an ‘easier’ life to work together for the betterment of all humankind.

The reality is, no one’s guaranteed an easy path in life. How many people with tons of money end up in worse positions than they started in? Or are just plain miserable? That’s because there’s a word lacking in today’s culture that people should ultimately be striving for:

Fulfillment. The feeling of being happy and satisfied. A full heart filling the mind.

We could die at any moment. That’s a fact. In that moment before you leave this earth you’ll have a chance to think about everything you wanted to achieve and how completing them made you feel; then – and in that final moment. Why wait when you can imitate that right now?

Take a moment to reflect how you feel at this exact moment about your life.

I’m sure you’re thinking about moments you were doing something. Taking action on what you love. Things your heart told you to follow.

Not what you had thought about.

Most of us confuse being busy with being a doer. Hiding behind a screen or keyboard definitely does not make you a doer.

Where can you start?

My dramatic shift in life happened when I made a decision based out of love; and not fear. When I started listening to my heart and allowed synchronicity to show me the power of doing just that. When I chose retrenchment rather than a paycheck to pursue something greater.

You don’t have to wait until something dramatic happens to you. Read books from people who have done just that and taken action on their dreams and learn from them. Don’t just be inspired – be inspired to act. Understand that even pursuing your dreams brings uncertainty and doubt around ‘should I carry on?’. Am I terrified about my new path? Absolutely. But boy am I excited about my future like never before.

Watch interviews with Richard Branson, Oprah Winfrey, Steve Jobs, JK Rowling. Find as many as you need until you understand this one major principle:

They all took action and listened to their hearts and kept trusting their gut (intuition).

What can you do to move into the ‘doing’ heart space? Think about:

1. How many ideas have you had this past week and how many have you acted upon?

2. Write down who your closest people are and whether they are talkers or doers?*

3. Who/What do you follow on social media? Are they positive role models on taking action?

4. Do you write down the ideas you have? Places you want to see? People you want to meet?

*I’ll tell you a secret that makes this easy to spot. Start becoming a doer and you’ll rapidly see who the talkers are around you.

Create accountability.

Put a marker down detailing when you’d like to achieve something, that way the years don’t continue to roll by.

I remember wanting to visit New York. It was one of three major cities that, for some reason, I always wanted to see. The other two were Paris and Rome, cities I ticked off in one European vacation back in 2005.

I’d never put down when I wanted to see New York and in 2012 – still had no plans in place. Enter the universe giving me a kick up the pants and one of the happiest phone calls I could ever receive:

“Andrew – I’m engaged, we plan on getting married in July next year and I want you to be my best man”

This was one of my great friends, Koos living in Aberdeen South Dakota, USA.

I’d never dream of missing his wedding, never mind miss an opportunity at such an honour. I agreed without hesitation and immediately, put plans in place to spend three weeks in the states and – you guessed it – stop over in New York.

Lessons from Travelling.

That stick in the ground gave me the impetus to make it happen. To plan the length of my stay and how much I’d need. To this day, it’s one of my all time greatest holidays and I learned some valuable lessons about travelling:

1. It’s the best opportunity to follow your heart every day and explore where it takes you. I’ve never been lead astray. In fact, my best experiences are the unplanned days doing this.

2. Three weeks is a great length holiday to maximise the long haul flights.

3. Splitting it into three equal weeks, doing something different in each is also a great way to maximise seeing what you want to. I.e. a week in New York gave an opportunity to fully immerse myself in the culture and city itself.

4. Poor exchange rates are just an excuse – you always find a way to make it work.

My challenge to you: Pick the top destination you’d love to see before you die. Depending on how far it is, decide the length needed to maximise the experience – and book a date now!

One of the best feelings in the world is the build up of anticipation before your trip. A month out; a week out; a day out; the moment your bum hits the seat in the aircraft – its all like being a child on Christmas eve again.

These are feelings you’ll never forget and fuel your excitement and enthusiasm for life. It gives us an understanding of tapping into our ultimate humanity.

I carry these memories with me up the mountain, making me smile at every step no matter what the weather or discomfort I may be in. Even better, I’m meeting people in Cape Town from the countries/cities I’ve visited and we share our travel stories while immersed in the beauty of one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

Travel stories connect us on another level where words need not be spoken – the twinkle in our eyes says it all.

The funny thing is, once you start down the path of listening to your heart and becoming a doer – its a fantastically slippery slope and ‘doing’ happens without needing to motivate it any more.

You have a thought born out of feeling.

You put plans into action.

Then you speak about it.

That’s how you change your world. And then?

That’s how you change the world.

Andrew Patterson is climbing Table Mountain every day for a year, in an effort to rally global citizens and positively empower a million people in 2018. To get involved click here:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

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The Rain drop that Became a Tidal Wave

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This has been one of the most phenomenal weeks of my life.

I live by working for the best; planning for the worst; and expecting nothing – swapping expectation for appreciation.

As my project completes week two, these three states seem to cascade over me with regular occurrence. I’m doing my best to stay focused on what I need to do and be patient, have trust that it will work out the way it’s supposed to. And believe.

On the physical aspect, so far my body, specifically my legs, are holding up really well. I’m now seven days into uncharted territory, as the most training hikes in a row I did was nine. Every day I remain rooted in how my body is feeling and climb Table Mountain accordingly.

It’s amazing how quickly our minds can race away with ideas – on the first half of the climb while my legs still feel fresh, I can get excited that perhaps my physical challenge is not going to be that difficult? And then I’m brought swiftly back down to earth on the second half of the climb when my calves, hamstrings and knees start to feel drained of energy as the gap between steps seems to grow each time I climb.

Incredibly, the place I’ve decided to place a rock to represent each day this year, is the perfect place to break this top half up. Not too high that its basically at the top and not too low that the rest of the hike would make me feel despondent. Below is my rock and the corresponding view it has (on clear days!)

Having these little landmarks to celebrate arriving at (others being the contour path and half way rock) make such a difference in ensuring my mental state is always positive about climbing the 730m vertical rise. It’s been a great lesson in how to tackle other life or business goals.

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First Signpost – contour path

 

 

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Halfway Rock
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View from halfway rock

INSIGHT: Create short term achievable goals that help you get to your overall objective.

I’m being taught to ingrain the principles of taking life one day at a time, one step at a time. Be prepared and know what you need to do to such a degree that every time you wake up, you know exactly what needs to be done to accomplish your major goal and larger than that: your vision.

I really do believe that we are better together and it’s when our heart is at the core of what we do; that we bring others along on a combined journey. A journey that has far more power than an individual can accomplish on its own.

The story of the Rain drop

There is a story of a raindrop that from the clouds up above, saw a town suffering with a lack of water. A natural dam had formed upstream, blocking the flow of water to the town.

He tried his damnedest to fall down to earth, reach the river, and break the dam down. Alas, each time he tried he failed. His heart sank as for the umpteenth time he returned to the sky unsuccessful. His best friend saw him despondent and asked him what was wrong.

Sharing his story, the friend listened keenly and just before the end of the story, another rain drop overheard him and asked him to repeat it. Determined, the three friends tried together to fall to earth, make it to the river and try smash through the dam.

Now it was three raindrops returning back to the sky with sad faces.

More people noticed the three droopy mouths and soon a large crowd formed around the three as they shared their attempt to break the wall down. The crowd started to chatter among themselves when the booming voice of a thunder cloud suggested each rain drop in the crowd gather as many of their friends and family, and get them to bring their friends and their families.

Millions upon millions of rain drops came having heard the story. The thunder cloud transported them upstream and told everybody to fall together and try land in the same spot. They listened and once they hit the land they quickly gathered in the water creating a flash flood.

In a short space of time – they broke through the natural dam, rescuing the town from the drought.

While the one rain drop wasn’t able to save the town on his own tried time and time again – it was he that sparked the others to join and with their sheer numbers and force – together saved the town.

We are better together.

Many of us discount our ideas or doubt that we can have an impact. I’m here to tell you to banish that thought from your mind. For good.

There will always be negative nancies trying to block the water, but don’t let them pull you into their reality. Stay true in your positive one.

The world needs people like you.

If all those rain drops stayed in the clouds the town would have all but died out. One act collectively can transform lives.

I’m inviting you to be part of 365 Ubuntu Climbs. I want you to close your eyes and imagine living in a shack; having children that can’t read yet and you barely earn enough to feed the family let alone send the to a better school. How would you feel hearing that you or a loved one had Leukaemia and you had a 1 in 100 000 chance of finding a match?!

Now I want you to picture:

  • Leaving your shack behind as you get the the key to your own house…
  • See the benefit of a new system that helps teachers educate children to read…
  • Matches patients with donors…

Imagine getting a second lease on life when it felt like all hope had gone.

See the ripple effect as people, down and out, start being given a helping hand.

Lets this year, put the ‘humanity’ into habitat for humanity; put the ‘heart’ into One Heart for kids… and be the ‘Sunflower’ (symbolizes longevity) in the Sunflower Fund.

Humanity, Heart, Longevity.

The very things we all deserve and can work towards.

Together.

For all.

You can donate and help me here:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs

2017 – A Year to Remember

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I write this as I wing my way back to Cape Town having spent a soul feeding week in the African bush with my family.

My dad reminds me today would’ve been gran’s 100th birthday. I don’t believe in coincidences. I’m about to embark on an ambitious year – and this is another heart warming moment of synchronicity to experience.

2017 has been one heck of a year.

I love the opportunity of hindsight to explore the events of the previous year. To “connect the dots” as Steve Jobs once said.

Here are the six most impactful events of my year and what each of them taught me.

1. Starting my year in Jokulsarlon, Iceland

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I chose to spend New Years in Iceland, in a tiny village called Vik. I shared the most incredible NY eve of my life with two other intrepid travellers from France. Never in our wildest dreams could we have predicted we’d see the northern lights dance above our eyes as Icelanders set off fireworks lighting the snow covered mountains up in red. Nature and man combined to create a show I will always remember.

They suggested I visit the area further east called Jokulsarlon, Glacier Bay.

A drive that belongs in the National Geographic Hall of fame awaited me and my prize: a receding glacier that’s created a deep bay filled with icebergs effortlessly floating. Ice that breaks off is ushered out to sea where the Atlantic uses its creativity to place blocks of ice across the black sandy beach as if it is it’s private art gallery.

Here – some 15 906 kilometers away from home as near to the edge of the world I’ve been – I feel for the very first time a tremendous love of my home. Our home. Earth. What a gift this planet is for us. My heart was expanded standing mesmerised by the beauty around me. Being so alone and yet incredibly connected all in an instant.

What changed in me: alone and in the harshest conditions I’ve ever experienced, I felt a realisation that we are never lost; just temporarily unsure. All it takes is asking for help and we can immediately be back on track. That sometimes its in being lost that we get to experience incredible surroundings with heightened senses that we’ll look back on with fondness and appreciation.

2. Having to find a new place to stay

This would be my seventh year in my flat and around February/March I had a thought “at some point I’m going to have to find another place to stay”.

I had no idea a few weeks later my owners would message me to say they needed to move back in and I needed to be out by end of May.

The rental market in Cape Town, and specifically the Atlantic Sea Board, has become a nightmare. Rental prices have sky rocketed and availability of units has all but dried up like our water due to people preferring AirBnB instead.

A dear friend suggested I write down absolutely every detail of what I wanted in my new flat. I was incredibly specific. After two months of searching with no success, it appeared I may have to take friends up on their offer to put my stuff in storage and stay in their spare room.

I looked at my list often and held steadfast in my belief I would find a place that met ALL the requirements. I had some wobbles where I thought “maybe I should just be happy with a few?”

Two weeks before I need to be out the managing agents of my current building send me a text “813 will be available beginning of June – do you want it?”

This came moments before I left for a weekend away. I was desperate to see it soonest and had to be happy with arranging a viewing Monday night. It was dark and with belongings all boxed up I didn’t quite fully grasp how perfect the flat was. I did get a good feeling about it and immediately messaged to say I’ll take it.

Only once they’d cleaned carpets and repainted and I moved in did I fully grasp how much of my list it satisfied – one of my favourites being able to lay in my bed and see Lions Head (those who live in Cape Town will understand what a rarity that is)

What changed in me: my absolute faith and belief. I was tested for sure; but being tested is how we gauge where we are in life. That I’d be in my same building, six stories up (literally moving up in the world) with my flat directly opposite the lift to move my furniture into is almost too good to be true and yet – here I am.

It’s been another massive stride for me to completely accept that whatever we want, we can get. Which is especially important for point number 4 coming up.

3. Going through a retrenchment

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I was emailed by a head hunter barely an hour before our department was going to hear what changes were being made. Before that point, based on the importance of my role, I confidently assumed I was going to be safe. That email triggered an immediate awareness that not only was my role in the firing line – but that this was the end of my time at Distell. My gut was speaking loud and clear.

My role had become a ‘promotion’ and even as others confidently suggested there was no one else qualified to do the job; I just knew it wasn’t going to happen.

I was right.

I was offered other roles but knew it would be disingenuous to myself and Distell to take them. I had lost faith in the company and didn’t feel any of the other roles suited my career progression. I’d just be taking it to have a job. I had a funny feeling something big was coming from this. I was terrified, especially at the fact that my future’s slate had been wiped clean.

I trusted it would be the best thing that ever happened to me – and I was right.

What changed in me: I started trusting to my gut and I also made a conscious move to start making decisions based out of love and not fear. Worrying about a pay-check and where money was going to come from was staying out of fear. I was done with that.

With uncertainty abounding I was a week from leaving when an idea dropped into my head that would (and subsequently already has) change my life.

4. Receiving the simplest idea

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Driving past Table Mountain the idea to hike up every day for a year was given to me and so 365 Ubuntu Climbs (Ubuntu is the spirit of humanity) was born.

Henry Ford said ‘whether you think you can or you can’t – you right’

I believe I am the luckiest traveller in the world, and that is why I saw the northern lights on New years eve. I have countless stories I can share about that. If you believe nothing good ever happens to you guess what…… nothing good ever will.

Taking the retrenchment with the faith and knowing that something amazing was going to come from it was rewarded a mere 8 days before my final day.

The idea set my soul on fire. Even when most people couldn’t grasp the enormity of what this meant, it didn’t waiver me from the endless possibilities it would create – both for me and others.

The idea was a simple one and using it as a platform to show people how easy it is to give by sponsoring me R1 a day would later develop into an audacious goal to use that money to positively empower 1 million people. Even as I sit here I can tell you that with each day that passes new ideas and exciting ways to achieve this goal flood my brain.

What changed in me: For the first time in my life, nothing but absolute self belief in achieving this feat existed in my psyche. This would be tested as the six month countdown began to such a degree that I almost allowed myself to get talked out of it from people who hardly know me. This taught me about how others can only see things from their perspective (which is based on their value system and experiences). They were looking at a piece of the puzzle telling me why that piece was a waste of time; while I was looking at the finished picture. It’s like arguing with a baker that egg, flour, milk, coco powder and villa essence mixed together will taste disgusting. Until they eat a slice of the cake created.

The greatest gift of all this year has been born from this idea. A deeper understanding of human behaviour, and not taking on others limited beliefs as my own. Just because you don’t believe you can do something doesn’t automatically mean that I can’t. In fact, I can see all the naysayers faces when everything I can see crystal clear in my mind comes into physical form.

It’s not about proving how right I am – it’s about following through on a simple idea that has the power to change a million peoples lives. Isn’t that something worth pursuing and being part of in 2018?

5. Speaking in front of 2000 people

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Once the 365 Ubuntu Climbs idea was given to me, I believed I could take this globally never mind to the rest of South Africa. I was introduced to a pioneer called JT Foxx, a man no stranger to naysayers and trolls, blazing trails across the world and giving people opportunities to elevate their success. A man who’s organisations credo is ‘powered by your success’.

He was hosting a Global event called ‘Money Wealth Business conference’ in Johannesburg on August 12th. People from as far as North America, Australia, Europe and Asia attended with the many local South Africans. It was the opportunity I’d asked for.

Not only had I spread my message to Johannesburg, but I now also had international supporters donating in support; even travelling from Switzerland to walk up with me.

What changed in me: I realised the power of following your heart and what you can accomplish when your soul’s been set on fire. What can feel like simple self development choices a year ago; like doing the “Courageous public speaking course” with Simon Ekin, could turn out to be instrumental later on. Like giving me the platform to speak in front of such a large audience. Passion speaks louder than being polished – and authenticity creates connection.

This has become the catalyst to show me how important to it is to have the courage to follow our hearts desire. That sometimes the worst thing we do to ourselves is over think things and the best gift we can give ourselves is to go for it. Take action. Move forward. That stumbling is better than standing still.

Nelson Mandela – who’s 100th birthday would’ve been in 2018 — said “it always seems impossible until its done”

My question is: Why couldn’t you be that person?

6. Traveling (again) to America over my birthday

JT Foxx hosted the Mega Success event at Disneyland in November and I’d have the opportunity for more coaching at his house afterwards. With no travel in 2018 I took the plunge and dipped into my bond to pay for the ticket. Something most people would frown upon as careless; but my gut said there was opportunities waiting for me I’d never otherwise get staying behind in Cape Town.

Ten months after arriving back to the day from my European vacation, I boarded a plane on my 38th Birthday bound for the US for the second time in my life.

Thanks to an amazing human being, Jessie Stuart, I was able to extend my trip by a week and stay with her in San Francisco. She’s an incredible human being that does fantastic work with Pencils of Promise, a non-profit dedicated to building schools in the poorest countries around the world. Her passion and enthusiasm for life, travel and focusing on what we can do instead of what’s wrong – is what we need more of in this world. Throw in the opportunity to travel with one of my best friends Lisa and without stepping foot off the plane, I already knew what a transformative three weeks these would be.

What Changed in me: my openness to listen to people with varying opinions to my own expanded. Life is about evaluating all the available information at our disposal and making our own informed decisions. Too often we follow one set of principles blindly or as gospel (religion, politicians, self help gurus, business giants, health experts) instead of understanding there is no one right way; but there is a right way for us – listening to our intuition and developing a deeper trust in our own decision making.

Success, much like happiness, is not a destination but rather a result of what we do and how we live our lives. Chase excellence, and success will follow. Chase fulfilment in everything that you do and happiness will abound.

We’ll never live in the absence of fear, of pain, of doubt, of difficulty.

But we can choose to push through bravely with love in our heart; with an understanding that pain can create drive to improve our lives; doubt is is just a made up ; difficulty is essential to develop appreciation and gratitude.

Stop hoping trying and wishing and start doing.

2018 will be a success because I will work and act in a way that I will create it. I won’t try I just will. Thoughts are nothing without actions. I am climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018 as living proof that powerful ideas while powerful – are meaningless without doing something with them.

If you had challenges in 2017 – be grateful for them.

My wish for you in 2018 is not just to feel inspired; but to feel inspired enough to act.

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I’m having a Bad Day

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Bad days are just like commercials; they annoy everybody but eventually they go away.

Don’t you hate it when something goes wrong and someone says ‘everything happens for a reason’?

Yes they’re right – but it’s not what I need to hear in that moment.

The focus is largely always on the positive side of life, as if that’s the constant normal state that exists. The ‘bad days’ are neatly forgotten or ignored when they are an important part of our lives.

How do you generally feel about negativity or the ‘bad days’ you have? Most of us try and push through or suppress them and pretend everything’s ‘fine’. Get on with it, so to speak.

I know this. I’ve lived it, but the reality is we wouldn’t know what a good day feels like if we didn’t have the bad. We wouldn’t know what happiness is without experiencing sadness and pain.

I know what you thinking – do I really need to have bad days?

Short answer: yes.

Long answer: Try this

  1. Get a blank piece of paper.
  2. Draw a Y and X axis – 0 being sad and 100 happy on Y axis and 0 to 100 being years on X axis.
  3. Think of your earliest happy memory and plot that.
  4. Now think of a sad time after that and plot that.
  5. What was the next happiest memory after that? Plot that too.
  6. Keep going until the present day.

Welcome to the cycles of your life.

Point number one: Every bad experience is always followed by a good one. And visa versa.

You might still be asking ‘Yeah but do I really need to experience the bad??

Absolutely! Why?

Appreciation

If happiness was just dished out willy nilly no one would appreciate it. Just look at this planet we’ve been given: pollution and abuse run rampant.

Think of someone who just gives their children whatever they want whenever they want. On a scale of 1-10 rate how highly those kids appreciate what they have… or are they always asking for the next thing?

Life becomes easier when we accept there are going to be bad days; maybe weeks (Anything longer than that and deeper questions need to be asked – nobody is supposed to have sustained misery)

I’d like to offer you my tip when these bad days roll in.

Embrace them. Don’t fight it. If it becomes the absolute worst day ever, let it. Swear at the world if you have to. Curse everything and everybody out of frustration. Be the spoilt toddler that isn’t getting their ice cream.

It’s like doing a controlled burn so you don’t have a runaway fire later on.

Get. It. Out. Of. Your. System.

Deep down you know it’s not going to last and that when the sun shines tomorrow it will be better (even if its just a tiny bit) Allow yourself to feel what its like to be down, depressed, angry, hopeless, fearful and disillusioned.

You give yourself such a hard time when these days occur and feel you should push it down; put on a brave face and soldier on. Tell everyone how ‘amazing’ life is while secretly dying a slow death inside. I’ve even told a friend to rent ‘Schindler’s List’ just so she could cry even more and really release everything that was bottled up inside. (It worked by the way)

By embracing these days you allow yourself to move on quicker. All the while moving forward with less baggage. We’re ‘human beings’ not ‘human nofeelings’.

What have I learnt by doing this when others are having a bad day?

Listen.

Too often we try (and I’ve been guilty of this too many times) and jump into solution mode. When actually maybe all they need is an empathetic ear to listen. I’ll never forget my mom telling me ‘a problem shared is a problem halved’.

Just remember there’s a difference between sharing and whining; this isn’t about having a pity party and bemoaning how tough your life is – because then the next question coming your way is: ‘okay, so what are you going to do about it?’

You have all the strength and power within you. Believe in that. Empower yourself when times are good so that you know you can make it through the bad ones.

You going to have another bad day. Make peace with that, and don’t get stuck thinking that it’s going to last forever. Who knows – maybe there’s a lesson in those days that will change your life forever.

You’re allowed bad days, so don’t be so hard on yourself when the next one rolls around. One magical thing this mind-set allows you is perspective; it allows you to look deeper at what is happening and why.

After all; everything that happens to us is based on a decision we’ve made at some point.

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Climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018

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I have a dream to help South Africa.

I have a dream to inspire people to discover what it feels like to live with passion.

I have a dream for love to fill people’s lives in spite of what life throws at them.

What is your greatest dream for your life?

 

Next year I’ve decided to climb Table mountain every day . That’s 365 ascents come rain, shine, heat, snow, hail or wind.

 

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The route I will take up each day – Platteklip Gorge

 

The idea was inspired by three main things:

1. Recently retrenched I, with no desire to head back into corporate, have no time restrictions any more.

2. I’ve been raising money and awareness for worthy causes actively for the past four years now and I want to do it every day.

3. I was introduced to a woman a month ago who’s climbing Table Mountain 67 days in a row for Nelson Mandela day.

On the 22nd June 2017 my idea was born as I drove past Table Mountain.

It’s a spectacular sight. It’s even more of a privilege to live in it’s protective shadow. What an honour it will be to face it daily and be tested.

I’m already learning lessons and I haven’t even taken my first step.

I’m raising money and awareness for three organisations that build homes; educate children and build on the existing database for Leukemia. Empowering people to take ownership of their lives.

I resonate with people that have taken tragedies and turned them into positives; improve peoples lives by not just giving handouts – but teaching them to become self sufficient. There are initiatives I’ve recently heard about in our townships I’m excited to learn more about and work with. I’ll keep you posted on who the twelve organisations will be.

Where do ideas come from?

I’ve been thinking a lot about this and how some people have amazing ideas that launch companies or products that change the world. Internet, flight, Virgin, medicine, take your pick there’s tons. These were all just thoughts in someone’s head that they then materialised.

I remember a colleague at The Pro Shop (a golfing sports store) constantly walking around proclaiming “all you need is ONE idea… ONE IDEA!!”

He’s right.

They don’t even have to be complex – like this one.

Just do one thing consistently for a full year.

I’m 37 now and I have no doubt that my life experiences (good and bad) and beliefs have shaped what, is for me, this perfect opportunity to do all the things I love.

This statement rings truer than ever now:

When the voice and the vision on the inside is more profound, and more clear than all the opinions on the outside, you’ve begun to master your life. ~Dr John Demartini

Powerful.

 

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The view from my 3 Peaks Challenge January 2016 (Lions head / Devils Peak / Table Mountain all in one day)

 

Self Belief

Last week I talked about ‘what defines your self worth’ and that plays a big part in this too. How many times have you had an idea, shared it, and been shot down by someone? Most likely you suddenly lost your shine and the idea started to fade. Ag it probably isn’t a good idea anyway We’ve all told ourselves that.

We allow others fears; their anxieties and their way of living to become our own – and it will cripple you if you keep allowing it. That’s why its important to surround yourself with people that continue to inspire you and share your passion and enthusiasm for life and support your dreams. Not their version of them – but your dreams; whatever they may be.

There’s no right or wrong way really; there’s just your way.

It’s like someone telling you who you should date based on what their own criteria is. You wouldn’t do that, would you?

The converse is just as important; it’s not just about how you are supported – but how you support others.

This idea opened a door to a new way of thinking. I stood on the balcony of my friends holiday home this past weekend enjoying the sunset. Surrounded by his best people for his 30th celebration, I took a moment to watch it alone. As if one of the mighty waves in front crashed over me; I realised all the work we put into ourselves – physically, emotionally, spiritually, intellectually – eventually pays off. It’s like making a cake, it only tastes great when it’s finished – not when you’ve mixed half the ingredients.

Impatience is our false shepherd. We want results now and the “success” of having our dream job or home. We lose sight of the fact that all our perceived failures and disappointments are helping shape who we are; that we’re learning from them.

I’m one of the lucky ones – I absolutely love my life and have pursued it with gusto and relentless passion. I’ve dreamt big; still dreaming big! I’ve learnt to forget about worrying ‘how’ something will happen and just keep moving forward and try new things and explore. Even through the difficult times. In fact it’s in these times I’ve come to realise how we don’t need much to be happy either. My measurement of success has been how much I’m fulfilled and the positive impact I can make in others lives. In fact, I prescribe to the new definition of a millionaire:

The number of lives you’ve positively impacted.

Let’s change the World.

Our actions always have consequences. Just look at some of the pain being experienced right now. People are dying of starvation and yet half the worlds food is thrown away? We’ve ignored the negative consequences and now profit is more important than people.

What is your dream at the moment?

Do you feel you’re doing whatever you can to achieve it? Even discover it?

Does your soul feel like it’s on fire when you think about your dreams?

What’s stopping you?

I think we believe we have to do massive things once to achieve our dreams; I, in fact, think the opposite is true.

We need to do little things consistently every day – and the cumulative actions generate massive success.

Start today

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