Putting the Shoe on the Other Foot

give

There are many people ‘climbing’ their own personal mountains daily.

Today I want to transport you into the world of three people and what life is like for them; feel their daily climb.

The big difference: they can’t see the summit like an ordinary mountain so have no idea how much further there is to go.

The purpose isn’t to make anybody feel bad; nor guilty. These are wasted emotions and are signs you’re focusing on the wrong part of the equation. In fact, you should feel inspired and full of hope. The smallest actions combined with consistency can transform lives, landscapes and entire generations.

Sticking your head in the sand is one of the reasons people feel so isolated and disconnected. It’s better to know the truth and feel empowered to do something about it; than pretend nothing’s wrong and keep doing what you doing (because you can’t hide from truth no matter how isolated you make yourself)

We’re all one and working together for the benefit of all mankind is crucial and it’s where our path to ultimate peace starts.

You doubt donating R50 a month will make a difference? I’d like to put the shoe on the other foot and at the end – you tell me if that still rings true.

The following three stories all take place on the same day from different perspectives.

The Cursed Blessing

Having been in the grip of a terrifying water shortage, you’d think that the onset of Cape Town’s rainy season would be welcomed by everyone. This Tuesday saw the fifth straight day of torrential rain as the second massive cold front battered the cape of good hope.

Good hope.

That’s all Jackie was holding onto as strong winds decimated shacks all around her in the Joe Slovo informal settlement, an area with roughly 146 000 ‘houses’ – none of which have their own toilets or running water. Everything is communal.

With torrential rain and gusts of wind whipping through the shacks a simple task of going to the toilet becomes extremely dangerous dodging missiles.

These storms always bring fresh fears of flooding and destruction to these fragile homes. While those living in standard homes made of brick dance in the streets, Jackie’s street is starting to look more like an offshoot of the Atlantic ocean – with every centimeter of water rising, her heart beat rises in unison.

With such few valuables already, losing more yet again feels like a cruel punishment with no crime.

How I would give anything for four sturdy walls around me right now.

On Death Row committing No Crime

Jack used to whoop with joy when it rained like this. Back in the days when he could put on his wellys and splash about in the streets celebrating one of the planets ingredients for life: water.

Those days feel an age away. Isolated in his hospital room, his only ‘access’ to the outside world for the past few months have been his window, tv and visitors allowed in one at a time.

Your body’s at it’s most vulnerable during treatment of leukaemia and the greatest threat is infection of any kind. Quarantine starts to feel more like prison than treatment.

Being cooped up in a single room was starting to take its toll on Jack and thoughts of whether a final walk down the corridor to death was not an easier option, started drifting into his head. This was no way to ‘live’. Even though he felt weak from all the medication and treatments – he would give anything to be outside. Feel the rain against his skin. Smell the freshness in the air. See water flowing on the streets instead of down his window.

If only I could be outside.

A Dire Future

While rain was relieving many peoples panic of the immediate future, Jessica’s thoughts were further down the line.

Her daughters adult life.

She may have be watching her play outside but her thoughts were rooted in the future.

Every parent wants the absolute best for their children. Especially when it comes to education. Jessica grew up in a time when, just because of the colour of your skin, you were dictated to get the bare minimum in education. She vowed that would never happen to her daughter.

She was feeling distressed as barely a few weeks into her daughters schooling the teachers hadn’t received any materials to start teaching the children to read. No books. No educational material. Nothing.

Panic gripped her heart as the teacher looked dejectedly up at her from behind her glasses. Like dying of thirst with nothing but sea water around.

She felt like she’d been preparing for a tennis match only to arrive and being told you playing water polo.

By some small miracle – if only the school had help to teach all these children to read.

…………………………………………………..

You just read that. In fact, 80% of children in South Africa at grade 4 level can’t read this. THAT. Does not bode well for our future.

What kind of workforce will we have in twenty odd years?

Just because we are not responsible for the problems of today does not mean we can’t help with the solutions of tomorrow.

I learned this recently which, I think, is important to remember. Past mistakes (no matter how far back) give us clues as to what lies in wait for our future.

Most people know the story of the Great Library at Alexandria; it rivaled our modern day internet with knowledge and scrolls from every corner of the globe – a truly impressive collection: for the few.

Maybe most of you know it was burnt? How many know it was set alight by the masses kept out from the library? Excluded from having access to all the knowledge at that time?

Knowledge is and should be free to all to have access to. Educated minds are inquiring minds.

I don’t know about you but I want to live in a country where everyone has the freedom to expand their minds – just by picking up a book.

We can help make this happen together.

I want to live in a country where we do everything we can to provide people with the basic right to safety and access to their own toilets.

We can make that a reality together.

I want to live in a country where everybody is a donor for leukaemia (and organ donors too!) to help those who contract the disease have a second chance at life.

Now – tell me with certainty R50 a month doesn’t make a difference?

Be part of the movement.

Believe.

Giving

Andrew Patterson is climbing Table Mountain every day in 2018 to do his part for social upliftment. Building homes with Habitat for Humanity; Empowering schools with One Heart for Kids and increasing the Leukaemia database with The Sunflower Fund. There is no amount too small (whatever number you thinking about imagine the other thousands of readers thinking the same thing – it adds up quickly) You can pledge your support at:

https://www.backabuddy.co.za/365-ubuntuclimbs


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